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a closer look at William Brighams Stainless Steel Damascus with a scanning electron microscope


Tucker Parris

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so heres the long and short of it, i now work with grad students at UCI and have made friends with a couple SEM (scanning electron microscope) operates so we tested a buddys metal and what we found was rather interesting. here are some pics. 

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above is increasing levels of magnification to the micron level here we see that the metal has bonded on the atomic level.

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above we see the elemental migration between the bonded metals interesting to note the ni is the biggest differential. this also limits carbon migration into the 304

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hardness test AEB-L vs 304

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Edited by Tucker Parris
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From the hardness levels, I'd surmise there has been next to no carbon migration.

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3 hours ago, Al Massey said:

From the hardness levels, I'd surmise there has been next to no carbon migration.

yeah we were thinking the same thing. so thats interesting because this piece was cooked in the forge for a long time and by conventional thinking there SHOULD be more carbon migration... but the test prove otherwise. yay for science.

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Yes I think it has to do with available carbon in the AEBL...or rather carbon not being available.... as industry does carburize 300 series stainless.

http://www.aimnet.it/allpdf/pdf_pubbli/nov15/Maistro.pdf

http://www.asminternational.org/documents/10192/1849770/05352G_Sample.pdf/3841f98e-2bce-4f5d-9c97-f42726201e4a

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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On 5/12/2017 at 10:19 AM, Austin_Lyles said:

My favorite part of your pictures is seeing the microscopic pores on the boundary between etched steel/less etched steel. I'm curious to see what a hamon looks like with these microscopes.  

im planning on getting some pics of that too

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  • 1 month later...

I'm glad you shared this here. I had the opportunity to see some of his work with this recently and it's pretty impressive. It's great to see the results but also to truly understand what is happening here, especially since it challenges some preconceived notions.

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