• Announcements

    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  
Nicholas Fotou

Idea for quenching

9 posts in this topic

Forgive the crude drawing, but a friend had an idea.  Because oil and water separate, would it be possible to quench through the oil into the water very quickly then pull the blade back into the oil and out.  My friend had fairly decent success going quickly into a bucket of water and then into a tank of oil.  I realize that it would probably depend on the steel, but what do you think this process could potentially do for a blade.  I am fairly new to bladesmithing and only just completed my first pattern welded piece.  I would imagine that the forces of both mediums would create different forces on the steel.  would it increase/ decrease warping?  I would love to hear your thoughts.

new quench technique.JPG

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember thinking of something like this, I thought the oil might reduce the initial thermal shock and the rest of the cooling could be done in water. 

i don't think it would work the way I thought. 

It might not work for water hardening steels, or maybe it would be a way to differentially harden a blade. I honestly have no idea but It's fun to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heat treating is something that has been researched and experimented with exhaustively by scientists and industry professionals . My advice is that you do some heavy reading about what they do and imitate it as closely as you can. You will never be able to surpass the quality of a professional heat treat by trying to reinvent the wheel. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Nic, Welcome to the forum. I have nothing to add to this subject, other than, i really appreciate the fact you and your mate have thought about the processes involved and have the mental flexibility to think outside of the box. Its quite refreshing. Let me know if you give it a go and how it turns out. :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're certainly not the first to think of that, but the problem is that you want water first, THEN oil.  And that's only for a very very few steels.  You want the first part of the quench to happen quickly, then slow it down.  The pros use Parks 50 for this, because that's what it does.  The cheap use water then oil and risk cracking.

Mixing the two as you mention is just asking for trouble in that a water-hardening steel may cool off enough as you're plunging it through the oil that by the time it gets to the water it has not hardened.  Or worse, it HAS hardened and the shock of water makes it crack, which is what will happen to most steels.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the info.  I think I will steer clear of this, but I will definitely pick up some parks 50.   

 

I love this forum! I have found a second home

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Nicholas Fotou said:

I love this forum! I have found a second home

Exactly how I feel, specially with the knowledge of people like @Alan Longmire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Nicholas Fotou said:

Thank you all for the info.  I think I will steer clear of this, but I will definitely pick up some parks 50.   

 

I love this forum! I have found a second home

You won't be sorry; it is quite excellent stuff.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also  wouldn't the water boiling and vaporizing even if a small bit have the potential to blow hot oil all over you and your workspace ? Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now