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Another War Axe Finished


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Ultra Slick - Nice work. I like the lack of lines, if that makes sense. The constant taper is awesome and that Satin finish on an Axe - Mint. 

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21 minutes ago, Chris C-S said:

Ultra Slick - Nice work. I like the lack of lines, if that makes sense. The constant taper is awesome and that Satin finish on an Axe - Mint. 

Thanks for the kind words.  Like many makers, I enjoy when people notice the subtle things.

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Your welcome, oh and just checked out your website. Like your work, it too is simple, clean and easy to navigate. I feel a theme here Eric. :P 

Thanks for sharing it with us. 

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Very nice work- super clean. I'm about to give a small axe/hatchet a go, and was looking for a more colorful wood than the traditional hickory- probably going to be about 16"-18",  can you recommend any other more "exotic" wood types that would work well, or some traits I should look for? 

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56 minutes ago, Doug Crawford said:

Very nice work- super clean. I'm about to give a small axe/hatchet a go, and was looking for a more colorful wood than the traditional hickory- probably going to be about 16"-18",  can you recommend any other more "exotic" wood types that would work well, or some traits I should look for? 

Thanks Doug.  Honestly, I usually use ash, but there is evidence for other hardwoods.  Hickory, interestingly, is not really one of them.  There is fossil evidence that hickory was in Europe, but apparently the ice age destroyed it.  Ash is my main wood.  I used oak this time because I'm doing experiments with the oak, and hadsome long sections available. Oak was commonly used on european pole arms.  There is also that the axes in the Lough Corrib boat find in Ireland.  The 3 axes, dating to the 11th - 12th century, were found with sections of the haft relatively intact.  The hafts were prunus: cherry wood.  I've used some lovely cherry wood on some axes.  It adds some nice color, and it is quite durable.

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While not helpful, I live in Western Australia and we have LOADS of beautiful hard woods. Luckily for me i work 3-4mins away from a local saw mill who has everything you can think of. He also imports walnut and others from all over the world and mills it himself. 

Anyway, as an axe is on my TDL as well as hammers etc, i asked him what a good wood would be. He said as hickory is non-existent in Australia he recommends Spotted Gum. 

So, i was also looking for handle material for knives, and as i normally on use him for furniture and picture frames etc I really never looked at the smaller pieces he has in his shop. All i can say is WOOD PORN... Man, it was amazing and the combinations and ideas came flooding in. 

If you want to have a look at his stuff, http://thetimberbloke.com.au/products/ worth a browse. :) 

Sorry for hijacking the thread with non-useful comments. 

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23 hours ago, Eric McHugh said:

Thanks Doug.  Honestly, I usually use ash, but there is evidence for other hardwoods.  Hickory, interestingly, is not really one of them.  There is fossil evidence that hickory was in Europe, but apparently the ice age destroyed it.  Ash is my main wood.  I used oak this time because I'm doing experiments with the oak, and hadsome long sections available. Oak was commonly used on european pole arms.  There is also that the axes in the Lough Corrib boat find in Ireland.  The 3 axes, dating to the 11th - 12th century, were found with sections of the haft relatively intact.  The hafts were prunus: cherry wood.  I've used some lovely cherry wood on some axes.  It adds some nice color, and it is quite durable.

I consider myself incredibly fortunate to live in an area where hickory grows naturally-- hickory is basically a miracle of nature. 

I have used both ash and oak for hafts, because I knew there was historical evidence for their use; I had not heard of cherry being used until now-- I'm going to have to give it a try! 

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