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Salem Straub

New hammer acquisition, 300 lb. Beaudry!

37 posts in this topic

Nicely done.  I bet you feel better knowing that crack is taken care of :)

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I do feel quite good about it!

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I made the top linkage arm today, tying the brake to the idler arm. It's just a new bought 5/8" turnbuckle, with an extension welded to one side to achieve correct adjustable range of length. The eyes at the ends have lathe-turned steel bushings with a 5/8" bore welded into them to smoothly fit the pin/bolts.

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It can be seen in this picture, the degree to which I had to bend the top eye in to match the angle of the bent idler connection. The turnbuckle threads have locking nuts on both sides to keep the assembly stiff.

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Idler position with treadle up, brake on, belt loose.
Also note the spring box, fixed up and re-installed. It fits more snugly now, a good thing to my mind.

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With the treadle depressed- run mode, brake off. Pretty smooth, and the weight of the idler does indeed pull the treadle back up without need for a counterweight. The weight stays for now though, as it speeds up the treadle return.

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I have some 80mm 4140HT round on order, at about 30 rockwell. I'm going to turn that into rollers on the Hendey.

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The tapered gib needed some real work... so I took it down. Here's the back, which I brushed clean.

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The brass wear strips were coming loose, with one almost falling off... I figure they'd been allowed to come loose, and the ram sheared them off. I went to drilling out all the broken brass screws and re-tapping the holes.

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I had some round brass on hand to make the 3/8" screw for the wear strips...

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Slotting the head on a brass screw.

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A finished brass screw. Too much time though.

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After making one brass screw, I knew it took a lot of time... so the only thing I could find within 40 miles at a store was silicon bronze 3/8" hex cap bolts, which I then modified on the lathe into flathead screws.

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The tapered gib mounted back on the hammer, with all fasteners in tight and seven of them replacements.

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Tracks worn into the inside of the ram, by unlubricated rollers that were not fully spinning.

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Tracks ground out from one side of the ram, and surface smoothed and lightly re-shaped.

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Another view of smoothed inside ram surface, now the new rollers should glide much more easily.

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Ram side #2, also badly worn. The wear pattern is slanting and to the side and high up, possibly from the spring being run sloppy. This can't have been good- I imagine that's what would lead to arm breakage ultimately.

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Ram side #2 ground all better.

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Detail of smoothed and shaped ram inner #2.

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You know you've just been having too much fun when your hands look like this. Angle grinder swarf...

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Clearing the plugged-up oil holes in the ram.

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That's all I can do until the stock for the rollers comes in...

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OK, more progress on the hammer... here's what's new.
Having gotten the bar of 80mm round 4140 HT in, I began the roller turning project.
I researched the best strategy for heavy material removal with slow speeds and HSS tooling for this material, and found the recipe for this style of grind. It's got a heavy rake and is quite acute, called (I gather) in some circles a "knife grind." 

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Trying it out, it's fantastic. It really peels material off with less hp necessary, and puts most of the heat into the chip, not the tool. I could hog 5/16" depth of cut per side, with up to .010"/rev at 70ish sfm before my stupid tool holder would wimp out...

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With the good cutters, this job generated copious piles of thick blue and gold chips!
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The new rollers, next to the old ones.
The new ones are a bit bigger, .025" larger in diameter and the integral stub shafts as large as the journals on the spring arms will accept (1.40".) This to account for wear on the old ones, and to provide a slightly smoother ride and a little more possible arm pre-load.

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I was unable to get a consistent, nice finish on the 4140 after roughing it in, so I got as close as I could and finished by grinding and scotchbrite belts.

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Tomorrow I'm putting the rollers back into the spring arms, and re-assembling it all. Exciting! Well, for me anyway.

On a side note, the Hendey kicked butt on this job, although oddly enough it developed a case of "reverse Hendeyitis" in that the spindle developed about .030" of end play near the end of the job. I took up the slack at the rear bearing with the threaded collars, which seemed to bring it right back into line.

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I've been working on other things to make money the last few weeks, but I did buy some dies from a fellow forumite here (thanks man!) and they came in today.
These are likely Bradley dies, but will fit with a shim underneath. They are round-swaging dies so I'm having to grind them flat.
The faces are 4"x11" and die height will be 2" upper and 2.25" lower.
A file will cut them but they are semi-hard and spark like at least medium-high carbon steel.
SUCH nice big flat faces! Can't wait to smash billets!

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Salem, I have really enjoyed seeing your knives, their beauty and elegance, fit and finish is always an inspiration. I have been watching this rebuild, even though I couldn't do 10% of the work even with the right tools, not enough skill. You are truly a master craftsman in every sense of the word. Thank for sharing. 

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Jim, I really appreciate that, although I think you're way too kind...  thanks for digging the thread!

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I ground the top die nice and flat, and softened the edges just a bit with an angle grinder, then did the same to the bottom die...

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Then took measurements of the ram dovetail, and found some stock the right thickness for a key.  Here it is blocked up on the grinder mag chuck, machining 1/8" taper per 11" off, 13" total key length.
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Top die, 1/8" shim underneath and die key rough-fitted.
I drove it in about halfway with a deadblow, it will be finish fitted with blue dykem and selective grinding. The ram looks good with that die in it, though!

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Edited by Salem Straub

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You can see in that die grinding pic that the sparks are pretty explody... at least 40 points carbon I'd say and possibly more.
I think they'll work great!

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