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Troels Saabye

Time to build a power hammer WIP

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This is what I did 

anvilmock.jpg

Anvil.jpg

The bottom piece is 12" round, about as tall as a bucket, the top piece is 8" round.  There are welded ears with bolts, 3 each.  The top piece bolts to the bottom, the bottom piece bolts to the base plate.  Those have never come loose, though I check them every so often.

Geoff

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Anything from 3 feet to 30 feet long. Nice build Geoff :)

Edited by Troels Saabye

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Square or round stock? 5" square is a lot heavier than 5" round. 5 inch square 10 feet long is 850 lbs with the recommendations of 10:1 ratio you would want a 2000 lb anvil. But with looking around at commercialy available hammers like big blu for instance there 155 lb hammer has a 1000 lb anvil. They claim this has been scientifically tested to be optimal without going overboard. 

I have found this site to be amazingly usefull for figuring out weight of a piece of steel.

https://www.bostoncenterless.com/tools/metal-weight-calculator/

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I think you could get away with welding a couple together even though its hard to get a full penetrated weld on 5 inch square but if the lower die is distributed over all the pieces  you use for the anvil it would be totaly fine.

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Lead can be used to good advantage to add weight. When this hammer came to me the three pieces of square steel welded together in the center didn't seem to be enough. I added the 6 pieces of square tube and poured full of wheel weight lead, tremendous difference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tljZtBYDeSU

When I built this hammer apx. 30 years back the anvil was what I could get at the time. It was Ok for a while but when I began making damascus the anvil was clearly too light. I put the piece of 12 inch duck work around the steel and poured with lead. Unbelievable difference in blow efficiency, and it has proven to continue to work for many years. I was originally concerned that the lead might get loose, but it hasn't happened yet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVpZkcxdI1c

Originally I made the calculations about how much weight was added but have since forgotten. Adding the lead was a huge improvement to both tools.

Off topic: but while you are on my Ytube page I bet some here will enjoy this use of a 45 long Colt shell https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZgbNO8us30

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I guess I should add weight to my anvil... I'll keep an eye on the pile at the drop shop. 

I like that blasting video Matt! Nice hammer too!

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I have an old excavator hydraulic jackhammer bit that is 6.5 inches by 58 that weighs about 550 pounds; I am planning on using it full length for a power hammer anvil. i will need to sink it below grade about 15 inches to get it to my planned working height (not counting dies.) At a 10 to one ration, that gives me about 55 pound of tup weight. A smaller bit 4 inches in diameter is one of the contenders for the tup. I am not sure yet how difficult to machine that material will be; it is soft enough for a carbide burr to bite, yet a normal drill bit was not making much headway in a quick test.

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Great :).. Just realized : I dont have any equipment to drill in the I beams I planned on using :b so got to find something, im thinking mag drill maybe ?

Lead is an option, though it is really hard to come by in Denmark due to enviromental laws.

Would the 4-5" be able to weld with a stick welder ? or should I TIG them ?

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I swear I thought I replied to this earlier.

Yeah, just make a good fillet weld. Give it plenty of juice. 

Edited by Zeb Camper

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Okay :) thanks Zeb ! would it be enough to lay the bottom weld with stick and the rest filled with MIG ?

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I'd use stick all the way.  It is best for deep, heavy welds.

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Not to hijack Troels's thread, but does anybody have a photo or vid example of a guided helve air hammer? While at the scrap yard yesterday, i came across some loose spring leaves and flashed on the idea of mounting a cylinder in the rear connected to a pivoting spring arm going to the ram. I would like to look into this design. Pros/cons?

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I could see some advantages of using designs like this when you have an air cylinder with a relatively short stroke.

39012803891_5ae8d8cc4e_b.jpg

7192=2308-post-830-1135721272.jpg

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Great ^^ more pictures. Any ho - trying to figure : To build a hammer with static dies (not interchangeable) and make tools for that, or to make it with different dies ?

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With the weight of your tup you could get away with  having static dies. Smaller hammers it is nice to have interchangeable dies so you can make really aggressive drawing dies to move stock faster

 

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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Troels, it is nice to have a die set that has flats and a drawing die side by side, so you can draw out then flatten as you go. This is a pretty common setup on the power hammers i learned on. Jeremy, thanks for the photos.

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Yes.  Some people like combination dies, some people like flat dies and tooling.  I like flat dies and tooling, myself.  Combo dies put a lot of stress on the guides.  Of course, handheld tooling can break your arm, so there's that to consider...;)

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^^ What Alan said...all the power hammers I have used had combo dies(Phoenix and Bull) except the 100 lb Little Giant.

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Okay :) I just checked how to make interchangeable dies, doesn't seem to bad, what's the best way to secure the dies  to prevent them from flying off ?

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Traditionally they are wedged in dovetail slots, but that is not easy to do or easy to change.  Most modern hammers use bolts through tabs on the ends of the dies.

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