• Announcements

    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Joshua Wilson

Tang burning

10 posts in this topic

Can anyone give me advice on how to burn a tang into a piece of antler. How would I keep the knife blade from loosing its temper during this process?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Antler does not repond well to burning in.  I'd look at other methods.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the advice Alan i went ahead and did it and it did get the job done but left kind of a big hole ill have to fill with epoxy. Maby next time i will try soaking my antler a month or 2 before I use it i hear this method works well. I will continue on with this build and show a picture when finished. I am kind of a beginner at blade making but I will do this one correctly I burned the tang through and out the other side i will fill it with epoxy add a pommel then peen what tang is left. 

Edited by Joshua Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Antler smells kind of like...................., well guess I can't say that here! But it is bad and it does not work well as Alan said, and you have found out!

 

Drill it and then resort to these!!! Broaches I made and the pieces of tubing I cover them with when not it use! I ground them down and file my own teeth in!! These were made from a couple of Old Hickory knives picked up at the yard  sales and at the local Misson for a couple of bucks. Grind down or cut off excess metal making sure you leave enough metal for the teeth to be cut in. HINT: You can always take off more but it is hard to put it back!!

Pics 2015 159_zpsymmwvvpq.JPG

These were made from a couple of Old Hickory knives picked up at the yard  sales and at the local Misson for a couple of bucks.

Drill as deep as you need and waller it out. Then grab the broaches and go to work. The hole may be a little larger and that is OK as long as you fill to the bottom with epoxy! Even with burning the tang in your hole gets larger so the eposy has to do the work!

 

A couple of tips:

Use 30 min epoxy.

Thin the epoxy to get it to fil the entire void

Use one of those stirrer straws like you get at Macky Dees with your coffee. The stirrer goes in first and allow for the air to escape as the epoxy fills the void!  Also works to puddy the epoxy to make sure it fills the entire void!

Edited by C Craft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude this is awesome thanks. I have a few old kitchen knives i can make these tools from. I will still continue this knife build tho. Even tho the hole is a bit big it will still make a solid knife when epoxied and peend on the brass pommel im gonna make. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, drill a couple of holes in the tang and make sure that epoxy fills them. That makes essentially "rivets" which grab the tang much more securely.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another approach is to use a piece of commercial hacksaw blade to make a broach with the only downside beign that it is .135 (3.45mm) over the teeth but that can also be ground down for narrower blades. Having two of these with a thick and thin would cover all needs I would think.

DSCN1015.JPG

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For antler, boil for about 45 minutes and the core is soft, so you can just press the tang in. You're only limited to the porous part that way, which is less wide then the brown center. So if your tang is wider then that, this method doesn't work. Nice thing is though that you don't need glue either. The core itself already contains the glue which is released by softening it. Though if the tang is very narrow and/or relatively short and the porous part is very open, you do need a filler to fix the tang in place.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This ugly thing that is not a sax was made that way (first thing I ever forged).

06220030.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0