Jump to content

Beginner - Question about Tangs (for scales)


JamesK
 Share

Recommended Posts

So as a beginner with a very very cheap workshop, I don't really have the tools to make hidden tangs yet, as I don't have money or space for a drill press yet. Because of this I'm stuck to scales, which means I have to shape my tangs into what the handle will eventually look like. My issue is that my steel I use is thick and when I finish my blade and start my tang, the area for my tang is usually heavier, making the blade a bad balance. So I'm basically stuck with drawing out my tang to eventually have a flatter material. When I draw out my tang, how do I make sure that the metal for the tang stays through the midpoint of the knife so that when I eventually flatten the tang, part of it doesn't protrude either above or below the blade? I know this seems like kind of a stupid and obvious question, but it was an issue with one knife I made and I want to make sure I don't make this mistake again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are you using for a grinder? Can't you simply grind the excess off? When I make a full tang knife, I use a template to scribe the profile to and grind the knife to shape after forging. I think that full tang knives actually take more tooling than hidden tangs, but that's just me. You can accomplish a hidden tang using a hand drill and holding the handle block in a vice. You just need a steady hand. Start with a small bit and continuously upsize and redrill to help keep the hole straight.

If you have scales and want to make a hidden tang, you could always mortise the tang into the scales and glue them together. Or, you could try a frame handle design like this.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can easily make a hidden tang knife without a drill press. You cannot really make a full tang knife with scales without one. To answer your question, though, you just alternate between working the steel on the edge and on the flat.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

What are you using for a grinder? Can't you simply grind the excess off? When I make a full tang knife, I use a template to scribe the profile to and grind the knife to shape after forging. I think that full tang knives actually take more tooling than hidden tangs, but that's just me. You can accomplish a hidden tang using a hand drill and holding the handle block in a vice. You just need a steady hand. Start with a small bit and continuously upsize and redrill to help keep the hole straight.

If you have scales and want to make a hidden tang, you could always mortise the tang into the scales and glue them together. Or, you could try a frame handle design like this.

Thanks, and yea I'm bladesmithing as a hobby and only bought super cheap tools. I have a $80 vertical grinder, 4 x 36 belts, so nothing fancy at all. I have just ground out the tang before but since I have basic tools I like using them less, so I try to learn more forging techniques to minimize work on my grinder/angle grinder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might think about getting an angle grinder for the heavy work. Other than that, Jake has some good advice on the forging. In another thread you asked about forging the tip. Forging a knife blade (and tang) is about rotating the piece as you forge so that you forge bevels and profiles at the same time. It's a constant forge, adjust, forge, adjust process.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

You might think about getting an angle grinder for the heavy work. Other than that, Jake has some good advice on the forging. In another thread you asked about forging the tip. Forging a knife blade (and tang) is about rotating the piece as you forge so that you forge bevels and profiles at the same time. It's a constant forge, adjust, forge, adjust process.

Thanks, and yes I do own an angle grinder, It does help a lot but right now I only own two super heavy duty metal grinders which work good, but yea I prefer forging it but thanks for the advice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...