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Alan Longmire

Things you might not know can kill you

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7 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

If it's totally rusted the plating is gone, for the most part.  It is probably safe to forge, in other words.

Thanks. it is totally rusted. Also, if i have something that is plated but I would like to use, can you grind the plating off?

 

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Usually not a good idea, because then you have toxic dust everywhere.  Thin galvanizing (zinc plating), the shiny kind, can be removed by an overnight soak in vinegar or a few minutes in muriatic/hydrochloric acid.  Hot-dip galvanizing, the thick, dull greyish crystalline-looking kind, can also be removed by a soak in muriatic acid, but since it's so thick it takes longer to remove.

Chrome plating can be ground off, but wear a respirator rated for particulates.  A paper mask won't cut it.  And wear rubber gloves, finely powdered chrome can cause a nasty rash.

Cadmium, though rare these days, will kill you slowly in dust form.  A big problem here is that cadmium plating looks a heck of a lot like the relatively harmless zinc chromate you see on hardware these days.  That sort of gold-ish with hints of blue and purple, found on a lot of tractor hardware and such.  Cadmium has more of a grayish-gold tinge and more of a rainbow effect, but they are darned similar in appearance.

Zinc chromate-plated spanner:

chromate.jpg

Cadmium plated parts:

Electro Loh's Cadmium plated finishes

 

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Wow, they look exactly alike to me. So... maybe just stay with rusted metal from the junk yard till I'm more familiar with the different types of metals and whats safe/best to use.

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Always a good idea.  B)  Leaf springs, axles, sway bars, SOME coil spring,  that sort of thing.  Used springs may be subject to fatigue cracking, new spring drops are better.  Dunno if there's a spring shop at Kitty Hawk, though...

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Uuuuhhhhhhh... I just Welded on some of that. What are grade 8 bolts coated with? I thought it was zinc. I didn't breath it, but not a good idea anyway? 

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1 hour ago, Zeb Camper said:

Uuuuhhhhhhh... I just Welded on some of that. What are grade 8 bolts coated with? I thought it was zinc. I didn't breath it, but not a good idea anyway? 

Cadmium is one of those heavy metals that you do NOT want inside your body. You know that pink Himalayan salt? Yeah, that's cadmium giving it that color.....and the blue stuff? That's cobalt . Another toxic heavy metal you do not want to eat.

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Usually  that color on grade 8 bolts is zinc chromate.  Cadmium is mostly used now in aerospace, chemical processing, and other critical applications where something absolutely can't rust.  But it used to be widely used on car parts.  Welding on any plated metal is a bad idea without a respirator and/or positive fume extraction.  Heck, even welding stainless produces hexavalent chromium, which is pretty bad for you as well.  So given that "chromate" part of zinc chromate, it might release 6Cr when vaporized as well.  

I think we can agree heating plated stuff is a bad idea.

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I am an aerospace machinist, and while legally i cant give any details, i can confirm that theres quite a bit of aerospace parts that get cadmium plated. Nasty stuff, you really dont want to be around it. 

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I was going to post this in a new topic, but it won't let me. 

A home built power hammer warning. 

Power hammers will kill you. 

I expeirienced the spring "grenade" followed by flailing arms today. 

If you think you should rebuild a part; rebuild it. Also, dont use pipe for any structural joints.

Try not to get yourself killed like I almost did

I'll post aftermath pics when I have better service. 

 

  • Sad 1

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Wow! That is seriously ungood.

Glad you are OK.  It sounds like an opportunity for a spontaneous wardrobe redecoration. 

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So, What happened is: 

I got eveything finished except for paint, so I decided to run it pedal to the metal. 

"ThukThunkThunkSNAPBOINGSLAP SLAP!!!

It worked great for a few blows (although quite scary) then the wrist joint snaped, and then the arm got caught on the frame on the way down. This sent the spring flying out the door of my shop. The spring was cut at a very sharp angle that could've impaled someone. It also bent the reinforced 1/8" thick crank plate straight up and may have ruined my pillow bearing. 

I only took pics of the wrist joints and the spring. I get to rebuild this tomarrow all because I ran those makeshift wrist joints against my better judgement. 

You can bet that I'll be going over the whole thing before tryin it again.

 

20180421_183255.jpg

20180421_183252.jpg

20180421_194238.jpg

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Yikes! Glad you, everybody nearby and everything nearby were unharmed. Could have been much worse. 

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If you think something is overbuilt, add a bit more to be safe(r). Glad you are ok....

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I got another one :unsure:

Pressure release valves on propane tanks can kill. 

In Virginia, you can have temperature changes of 40° in a day. 

I got my 100lb tank filled bright and early when it was a cool 60° and left it at the shop door out in the sun. I went about my day welding, and playing loud music and could smell propane. I thought it was just my regulator/hoses next to me, but It got thicker and thicker. I walk over to the tank, and it's just pouring out propane and Ice actually formed on the release. 

When It gets filled cold, then the tank heats up, the gas expands causing the release valve to open. When your shop gets full of that stuff I wonder if you could suffocate or blow up? 

Be careful out there!

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