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I already asked about the tang and tip of a knife and I'm beginning to get the hang of that, but one issue I have now are the bevels of a knife. I understand it's about holding the knife at an angle half of the angle of your strikes, like if you hit straight down hold the knife at 45 degrees so both ends flatten the same. Obviously this just takes practice but does anybody have any tips or video links? Thanks

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It is muscle memory, but there are 2 methods I have tried. I forged a puukko-ish knife, and I wanted a bevel along the spine so I could leave it as a forge-finish area. I started by forging it like a knife that would have a triangular cross section. When forging a triangular cross section, it is important to hammer at an angle, but it's not as important to hold it at an angle because the side on the anvil is going to be flat anyways. All you have to do is switch sides each heat. When I established the bevel along the spine, it became more important to hold the blade at an angle so the line that forms there is even on both sides. When you do bevels and hold the blade at an angle, a dagger for instance, you hammer at an angle that you think is right, check where the bevel is on each side, and if the bevels are not right you correct the angles on the next heat. Once you have hammered the bevels out all the way, it is really difficult to fix. The only fix I can think of for a dagger with a flat side and a peaked side is to open up a vise so you can hammer down the peak in the middle while propping up the edges. Here is a video of me forging a blade: 

 

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16 minutes ago, Wesley Alberson said:

It is muscle memory, but there are 2 methods I have tried. I forged a puukko-ish knife, and I wanted a bevel along the spine so I could leave it as a forge-finish area. I started by forging it like a knife that would have a triangular cross section. When forging a triangular cross section, it is important to hammer at an angle, but it's not as important to hold it at an angle because the side on the anvil is going to be flat anyways. All you have to do is switch sides each heat. When I established the bevel along the spine, it became more important to hold the blade at an angle so the line that forms there is even on both sides. When you do bevels and hold the blade at an angle, a dagger for instance, you hammer at an angle that you think is right, check where the bevel is on each side, and if the bevels are not right you correct the angles on the next heat. Once you have hammered the bevels out all the way, it is really difficult to fix. The only fix I can think of for a dagger with a flat side and a peaked side is to open up a vise so you can hammer down the peak in the middle while propping up the edges. Here is a video of me forging a blade: 

 

Thank you so much! I had the idea that it wasn't critical to hold the spine at an angle so that the edge was angled down and to hammer at an angle also, but your way seems to make much more sense, thank you, and I appreciate you leaving a video for reference

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