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Chris C-S

Father son pair.

40 posts in this topic

So here is the start of this pair. Lack of time in front of the grinder is very evident. Oh well the only thing that will improve that is more knives. Lol. About to head to HT, just need to drill holes for pins. :)IMAG0060.jpg

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@Garry Keown this is the progress on the new knives from the clean bench on Sat. 

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So are you going to have the scandi grind on the larger of the two blades to a zero edge or go with a micro bevel @Chris C-S 

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Plan is a Zero at the moment, but my average skills at the grinder may change this. I was having some issues, and very timely, @Walter Sorrells has published a video on correcting grinder issues. Lets hope i can put these into play. Further more, i hope a hardened blade is a little more forgiving at the grinder as this thing shreds metal. Perhaps i am just too heavy handed. 

Do you free hand or use a jig? 

13 minutes ago, Garry Keown said:

So are you going to have the scandi grind on the larger of the two blades to a zero edge or go with a micro bevel @Chris C-S 

 

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I use an adjustable jig I made Chris that I can set for the various angles I grind to. The scandi jig is a fixed angle so I can replicate it on the production safari knives

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Cool, i don't think there is anything wrong with jigs, i just need to get my angles sorted. Do you have a picture of your jig? 

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Belt sanders tend to leave a slightly convex surface, so for scandi grinds I like to use 120/220 grit sand paper on a surface plate to make sure they are flat. It could be hard with a ricasso, but it makes blades that are easier to sharpen on a stone. A lot of my earlier knives had scandi grinds and it took me a while to work out the way I like to do it, but I'm glad I did and it's a type of knife I've found very useful.

Edited by Aiden CC
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Those profiles look really good:D. I still struggle with grinding sometimes too. I'm not sure if the jig is only for a scandy or whatever angle you want. But, if you return to freestyle, It helps if you mark the center of the blade edge. Take a drill bit of the same thickness of your blade and just push it along a table to scribe the center of the blade edge. I usually sharpie off a measurement from the blade edge toward the spine with a micrometer  to set the top of my grind. Best of luck, just remember to take your time. We all have to learn to walk first, then we can run.  Dillagence, Drive, and the determination to do the best you can do will allow you to do greater things than someone who is more capable, but doesn't strive to be great;).

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3 hours ago, Chris C-S said:

Cool, i don't think there is anything wrong with jigs, i just need to get my angles sorted. Do you have a picture of your jig? 

For the adjustable jig I used 3x1/4 angle aluminium and a piece of flat and some piano hinge. I countersunk for the rivets for  the piano hinge and then peened the remainder of the rivet heatt so I have a completly flat surface. The ittle bolts are threaded into the top plate to bear on the bottom one so the angle can be adjusted although the little bolts have been replaced by 10mm ones. The square is to show how the bevel will look but after doing the first ones I now measure the distance over the outside edges of the angle and the flat with those measurements noted down so I can re-adjust for any of the usual knives I make. The three slots in the top of the angle are to locate the file guideand for the longer blades I can use the outer slots with the general sized blades all working from the center slot. I have a mark on my file guide for the top of the blade so thata the edge is about the same height as the top of the angle for easier sighting and grinding. The old file guide in the pics is one I made from a file and hardened but soon discarded it in favour of the carbide faced one from Bruce Bump as noted above. The bottom flat on the guide is free to drop down as the adjusing bolts only bear on it rether than being connected to it but it gives consistant grinds so I am more than pleased with it.

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Edited by Garry Keown
clarity
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For the fixed guide I use for the scandi grind I ground the angle on the 10mm base and screwed the angle aluminium to it The 10mm bolts are the "handles" I use to move it on the work table against the grinder.  The aluminium is screwed to the base with countersunk headed machine screws. The carbide faced file guide is in this one.

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Edited by Garry Keown
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I was trying to figure out how to get my file guide in on the action. I tried a jig without a file guide and freehand with a file guide on the weekend. Both were interesting. 

I had another look at the blades last night and to be honest they are not that bad, particularly as they are within the first 5 blades ground on my homemade belt grinder. 

I will raid the ally bin at work before going home tonight and 'source' some of the appropriate materials. With the multiple 'elevation' screws how do you ensure the angle is consistent? (or am i just over thinking this?)

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There are just two adjusting screws and I habitually set the right one first then hold it firmly while screwing the second one down till it just bears on the bottom plate and then tighten the lock nut. When I first made it I would slip a piece the finest paper under the second one when it was tightened to see if I got 'hold' on it when trying to remove it so I knew that both sides were bearing on the bottom plate to the same extent.

Edited by Garry Keown
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Thanks all, i have my makers mark and these will be getting stamped and HT this weekend, fingers crossed.!!!

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Hey too all those following and supporting me on this build. Here are some pics post HT and hot vinegar etch. Edge quenched, twice unfortunately due to not hardening first time round. Hand sanded to 600g then hot vinegar and scrubbed with 0000 steel wool about 6-8 times, with roughly 5-10mins per soak. 

Thoughts/advice/comments? IMAG0116.jpgIMG_20170809_170633_952.jpg

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On the first, it really looks like the spine got a little hard on them.  Did the spine skate a file?  

Looking good though man

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30 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

On the first, it really looks like the spine got a little hard on them.  Did the spine skate a file?  

Looking good though man

I think what happened is I brought the whole Blade to temp, then as I edge quenched I started to see the black run up the blade and thought "yep, dunk it" not realising that the spine, if still red would harden too. So, in short yes, the spine is hard, but I'm OK with that. Getting onto handles and hopefully finishing today/tomorrow Inc. Sheaths with some hard work. Many many firsts. :D

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Looking good! I like your mark? Do you have a stencil for the mark?

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Hey Aaron, it's a punch. See topic "makers marks" it's in there. These two were my first time using it and I miss hit etc. Then tried it hot and got burnt. Meh. All part of the process is guess. All glued up and prelim shaping done Thanks. 

IMG_20170811_094937_479.jpgIMG_20170811_103201_541.jpg

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Looks good Chris!  What type of wood is that?

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1 hour ago, Alex Middleton said:

Looks good Chris!  What type of wood is that?

It's a western Australian hard wood, called river red gum. This piece has a particular figure called 'flame'. This is the board it came from. IMAG0071.jpg

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I like that.  I'm looking forward to seeing these once they are done.

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You Aussies have so many cool woods to choose from!

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5 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

I like that.  I'm looking forward to seeing these once they are done.

Thanks. Hoping to have handles finished today. :)

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5 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

You Aussies have so many cool woods to choose from!

You think? One thing I'm going to try doing is keeping my knives as local as possible. I have a saw mill very local to me and he has Bulk Timber he collects locally dries and mills himself. Here are some other pieces I have lined up. In order, WA Raspberry Jam, is a hard desert ironwood, WA Marri with it's iconic sap veins in it, Curly Karrah, and Rock Sheoak.IMAG0075.jpgIMAG0074.jpgIMAG0073.jpgIMAG0072.jpg

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Are you making these names up Chris? ;)

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