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Quench oil recommendations


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I have a rather newbie question to ask. I'm new to bladesmithing, and I need some help choosing a good quench oil to use. I'll most likely be using old files, rasps and leaf springs as my blade materials as I am on a rather small budget. Does anybody have any insight on what a good oil would be to use, and where I might be able to find it?

Also, can anybody point me in the direction of some good resources to use when choosing oils in the future? Any and all advice would be greatly appreciated. 

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I would recommend either peanut, canola, vegitable oil for a good quench oil. They get the job done and do it well for most basic carbon steels. Found at all grocery stores. Of course there are dedicated quench oils, but they are far above a beginners budget usually.

Maxim oil in Dallas, Texas makes Parks 50 quench oil, sold in 5 gallon jugs. It's a well respected fast quench oil. You'll find it's rather difficult to find any quench oils in small amounts for bladesmithing, as most companies sell large amounts to big manufacturer's. 

 

Please DO NOT use used motor oil or any oil that goes into a vehicle. Toxic fumes and what not. 

Edited by Austin_Lyles
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Austin is right.  Canola oil heated to about 130 degrees F is just as good as most commercial quench oils for the steels you mention.  Files need a fast quench and this will work, leaf springs are not as picky about quench speed and it works for them as well.

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And as for resources: This forum.  If you use a Google site search (site:www.bladesmithsforum.com <search terms>) you will will find just about any question a beginner would have has been asked and answered thoroughly (and often numerous times).  I'd also recommend you read all the pinned threads in all the sub-forums.  

Welcome to the forum.  

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  • 3 weeks later...

Seems like it would be expensive and would end up polymerizing on you.  It will probably work OK, but just not the most cost effective.  If it is safe, and if it gets your blades hard then feel free to keep using it, but from a cost and hassle point I would think you want something else.  At least the next time you need to buy oil.  

Edited to add missing "if" as noted in my follow-up comment below.  

Edited by Jerrod Miller
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Raw linseed is okay, but probably slow.  Boiled linseed is toxic and can be very flammable, and both are very expensive compared to canola or vet-grade mineral oil.

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I see that I missed the "if" in my previous comment (corrected now).  I was unaware of linseed oil's toxicity.  Yeah, stay with canola or similar.  

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2 hours ago, GEzell said:

Usaknifemaker.com is now selling Parks 50 by the gallon... That said, it's really too fast for leafsprings, imo.

They are also selling Parks AAA it is a slower quench! I think all the specs for both are on their site! 

http://usaknifemaker.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=Quench+oil

If the specs aren't there check the forum. https://knifedogs.com/ I know they are posted on there!!  https://knifedogs.com/threads/aaa-and-parks-50-data-sheets.46721/

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Canola is cheap, and works 90+% of the time for 90+% of the steels most commonly used in bladesmithing.

Safety tip: Please remember that oil floats on water. If you leave your quench tanks outside in the rain, the water will go to the bottom of the tank and you won't even notice it.  Repeat this for a few months, then quench a long blade and the following happens: The red hot tip of the blade plunges through the oil and hits the water lurking at the bottom of the tank.  The water explodes into steam.  The steam explosion throws the oil upwards in a vaporized cloud into the air.  The vaporized cloud of oil hits the still red hot bits of the blade not yet quenched and turns into a huge fireball and burns your shop to the ground (and you if you're really unlucky).

Be careful. Wear protective gear. 

Sorry for the lecture . . . everyone may (probably does) already know this.

Luck in the quest.

Dave

 

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With permission I take the subject to make an appointment. Here in Spain, it is not easy to find canola oil at a reasonable price. I have read that sunflower oil could also be a good alternative, do you think it could serve as a cooling oil?

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1 hour ago, Jesus Oliver said:

With permission I take the subject to make an appointment. Here in Spain, it is not easy to find canola oil at a reasonable price. I have read that sunflower oil could also be a good alternative, do you think it could serve as a cooling oil?

I believe that canola oil is more often called rape-seed oil in Europe.

I switched from canola to the 11-second oil from McMaster Carr a couple of years ago.  To be honest, I miss using the canola.  It didn't flame up like the "real" quench oil does, and it smelled a lot better.

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6 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

I believe that canola oil is more often called rape-seed oil in Europe.

Also "vegetable oil" for some reason or other.

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7 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Mi conjetura es que cualquier aceite usado para freír profundamente hará casi iguales. Así girasol, cacahuete, canola, etc. 

 

7 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Creo que el aceite de canola es más comúnmente llamado aceite de colza en Europa.

Cambié de canola al aceite de 11 segundos de McMaster Carr hace un par de años. Para ser honesto, extraño usar la canola. No se enciende como el "real" quench aceite hace, y olía mucho mejor.

 

58 minutes ago, Charles du Preez said:

También "aceite vegetal" por alguna razón u otra.

Thanks for the info. 
I knew about canola oil but here in Spain it is difficult to find it, years ago there were serious problems of adulterated canola oil poisoning and practically disappeared from the market. 
My next job will be quench in sunflower oil surely. 
A greeting.

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