Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have one for you guys:

How much distal taper do you think I need for proper geometry on this blade? It's 3/16 thick at the ricasso and the blade is 4" long. 

Draw filing is exhausting and I wouldn't want to have a weird geometry at the end :/

As you can see I tapered the spine. This is fun :D

Thank you!

P_20170830_153056.jpg

P_20170830_190418.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 173
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I would definitely taper in both directions.  Yes for weight, balance and function, but more so for looks.  Personally, I can't stand knives that look like a bar of steel with a bevels ground in, and

Cover the spine and edge with ink from a sharpie, or real machinist layout fluid if you have any, and scribe in your taper lines.  That will give you something to follow as you remove the material, ei

Well, for this particular blade shape, I would have thinned down the primary bevel to maybe 0.045" instead of 0.063". It would have saved me maybe 3-4 hours of sanding. Beside that I would have waited

Posted Images

Prolly could get away with none. Its only a 4"blade. Also the tang looks really heavy. A distal taper will put most of your weight in the back if you are doing a tall flat grind. In that case a distal taper won't be helping at all. But, if you drill some holes in the back for weight reduction;(or taper the tang) a distal taper could be nice. Distal tapers are generally used on longer blades for balance, and it probably makes it less likely to self destruct under it's own weight. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Zebulon Camper said:

Prolly could get away with none. Its only a 4"blade. Also the tang looks really heavy. A distal taper will put most of your weight in the back if you are doing a tall flat grind. In that case a distal taper won't be helping at all. But, if you drill some holes in the back for weight reduction;(or taper the tang) a distal taper could be nice. Distal tapers are generally used on longer blades for balance, and it probably makes it less likely to self destruct under it's own weight. 

That answers my question very well. I was indeed going to drill holes for weight reduction in the tang. I had already started the distal taper. Got it down to 5/32" at the tip. Guess I'll stop there. 

Thank you for the quick response!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definitely taper in both directions.  Yes for weight, balance and function, but more so for looks.  Personally, I can't stand knives that look like a bar of steel with a bevels ground in, and some wood slapped on.  Tapering both the blade and the tang is far more aesthetically pleasing. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Wes, the appearance of a taper in both directions will look more deliberate (like you knew what you were doing). Also, this approach will probably be less likely to crack in heat treat (compared to drilling a bunch of holes). But, we are in beginner's place... I saw your edc knife, let me just say this blade is lightyears ahead of that one. I just worry you might bite off more than you can chew (expecially if you're only using files). Most people have the luxury of forging the distal in. And it can be a challenge for someone who is more experienced. If you can manage it though, I say go for it:D Just remember to mark all your grind lines, and don't settle for good enough! Oh, and if it tapers on each end I think it would be cool if that peaked spine went into the handle as well. Just my 2 cents.

Edited by Zebulon Camper
spelling/forgot something
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Zebulon Camper said:

the appearance of a taper in both directions will look more deliberate (like you knew what you were doing)

I will have to make sure I do that. It would be great if it looked like I knew what I was doing :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Distal tapering by drawfiling is a pain in the @ss. It's hard to remain perfectly straight too. Guess I'll take my time and measure frequently.

Your opinion is greatly appreciated, thanks for taking the time!

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Charles du Preez said:

I will have to make sure I do that. It would be great if it looked like I knew what I was doing :)

Oh, now I didn't mean it like that :lol: I meant that if you drill holes in the tang, and have a distall on the other end, It will still look like a heavy tang with a light blade. If you do it the other way, people will know at first glance, they might say: "Hey this guy must know what he's doing. This knife looks hella balanced" :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

I would definitely taper in both directions.  Yes for weight, balance and function, but more so for looks.  Personally, I can't stand knives that look like a bar of steel with a bevels ground in, and some wood slapped on.  Tapering both the blade and the tang is far more aesthetically pleasing. 

What would be your tapering ratio in such a case?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

What would be your tapering ratio in such a case?

I think there are too many variables for a ratio. Your grind angle, your handle material, and pin weight. To be honest you could probably just guess and it will get you close. I would just do whats pleasing to my eye. I would taper it down to 1/16" maybe. Or a hair bigger. Balance won't matter so much on a blade this small, most people making knives like these probably don't even give balance a second thought. I have never done a distal taper on a blade like this myself, I did tactical knives for a while when I started out, so it was ok if they were ugly. Then I jumped head first into the japanese knives wich have a hidden tang. So, I'm no expert, just saying how I would handle this. If we're lucky someone who knows a little more about it will come along and shed more light:)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cover the spine and edge with ink from a sharpie, or real machinist layout fluid if you have any, and scribe in your taper lines.  That will give you something to follow as you remove the material, either by draw filing or with your sander.  (Unless you are talking about an angle grinder, the draw filing will be faster)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

What if I mount the knife on my file jig parallel to the file with the tip towards me? This way I would file the distal straight and with the exact same angle on both sides...

I am definitely not looking for the fastest way here. Im looking for a fool proof way :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess this could work. I just hope you don't file for so long that you'll be making filing motions in your sleep:lol: My grandfather was a logger, he always said "you can fell the same tree with a hatchet that you could a chainsaw. Just takes more licks". Your determination will surely take you far :D But, I highly suggest you at least look into a belt sander, or something to take off metal faster than a file. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got old Globe 14" bastard files which are surprisingly fast at removing metal. I'll get down near and draw file to finish.

And since this is just a hobby, the time taken doesn't really matter. I want to do it right and learn as much as I can in the way.

Perhaps when I have made a couple successful knives and feel more confident, I might consider power tools :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm real interested to see how this turns out. Been riding in the truck all day at work, so I've had the time to watch this. You are really headed in the right direction for only knife #2. You should make a post of the finished result, at this rate I doubt anyone can be disappointed with whatever it looks like. You already have a good looking profile. Oh, and if this "disc sander" you speek of is soft backed, and oscillates, it will leave deep swirl marks. If it's hard backed and just rotates it should work good I think. Again, good luck :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Zebulon Camper said:

I'm real interested to see how this turns out. Been riding in the truck all day at work, so I've had the time to watch this. You are really headed in the right direction for only knife #2. You should make a post of the finished result, at this rate I doubt anyone can be disappointed with whatever it looks like. You already have a good looking profile. Oh, and if this "disc sander" you speek of is soft backed, and oscillates, it will leave deep swirl marks. If it's hard backed and just rotates it should work good I think. Again, good luck :D

It does not wobble but it makes a lot of noise and the children are sleeping :D. I also have never used it. 

The file jig makes a fine work so I stick with it for the moment.

Take a look at my messy basement :P

P_20170831_201848.jpg

P_20170831_201904.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

What would be your tapering ratio in such a case?

It really depends on the knife.  I make a lot of knives from 3/16 stock, so in those cases, I will take it down to around 1/16.  For me, it is a matter of aesthetics in most cases.  It shows an attention to detail that non tapered tang will not (in my opinion of course).  Honestly, I don't sweat the perfect balance like so many other people do.  Zeb hit the nail on the head. This is a small knife, balance is not as much of a concern as it would be in a bigger knife.  

I also like to sculpt my handles, and having a thinner tang allows me to leave more meat in the ass of the handle material so I can have more liberty there.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

It really depends on the knife.  I make a lot of knives from 3/16 stock, so in those cases, I will take it down to around 1/16.  For me, it is a matter of aesthetics in most cases.  It shows an attention to detail that non tapered tang will not (in my opinion of course).  Honestly, I don't sweat the perfect balance like so many other people do.  Zeb hit the nail on the head. This is a small knife, balance is not as much of a concern as it would be in a bigger knife.  

I also like to sculpt my handles, and having a thinner tang allows me to leave more meat in the ass of the handle material so I can have more liberty there.  

I got the blade tapered to 3/32" last night. The next challenge will be to find a way to hold the knife in the file jig to taper the handle. For the blade I simply screwed the handle but now I will have no holes + a distal taper against me..

I'll be scratching my head at work today!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...