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Stock removal with hand tools


Joël Mercier

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3 minutes ago, Shmuel said:

Yes, but I was wondering if you'd do it differently now that you've already done it once.

Well, for this particular blade shape, I would have thinned down the primary bevel to maybe 0.045" instead of 0.063". It would have saved me maybe 3-4 hours of sanding. Beside that I would have waited more before doing the peaked spine. It's a small surface and it would have been easy to sand it off after the heat treatment. In fact I think I would have done it last. I wasted time being careful not to touch the spine with sandpaper during the finishing.

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The final handle sanding and the first coat of Tru Oil is done. I am exited to show you the result but I will wait till it's entirely done. The bloodwood has a very nice chatoyance. I am glad I bought that block for dirt cheap.

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7 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

I like it alot! Now you can try out your sheath making skills! What you gonna do with this? If it were me I would sell it to buy equiptment, but I could see how you might want to keep it. 

Yeah, it does have a sentimental value. However I am curious to know what it would be worth.

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With a good sheath, I think I would charge $150. And, that's just my opinion. You don't have any value to your brand yet, so any more than that is just pushing it. But, here's some food for thought: think about how much faster you could make the next one with a $150 belt grinder. That's how much mine cost if I remember correctly. On the other hand, it might be priceless to you.

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I agree with the estimated potential value, ...but there is still the matter of the sheath. A poorly designed/executed sheath will make it difficult for the knife to reach its potential. It doesn't have to be fancy but it must look as properly made as the knife. 

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I still have no idea how to make a sheath. Just ordered some basic leather crafting tools on Amazon. I am waiting for a quote from a Canadian leather supplier. By the way I got a question: which leather weight do you guys use for knives this size? I was thinking 6-7 oz.

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IME I have a habit of overestimating the weight I need because I wet mold my sheaths and this stiffens up the leather so that a piece does the job of the next higher weight. 

Then you get to learn about dyes, edge dressings, finishes.

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I am definatly not a leather worker. I know enough to get by. 9 oz. Is Ideal for making belts, so 6-7 I think is good. I usually go by the mm. listing that is usually next to the oz. a tip for getting your stitch spacing: take a regular old dining fork and press it into the leather. Then I usually press a butter knife along the marks to make a groove for the stitches to sit in. I glue it all together and then drillpress my holes with a tiny bit. 

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Oh, you probably want to mark your holes, glue it together, drill it, then press in the groove, then stitch it. Make sure the butter knife you use is very dull with no serrations. I kind of wrote it in the wrong order before. 

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This is the guy I get my leather from 

https://m.ebay.com/itm/SLC-Natural-Veg-Tan-Cowhide-Tooling-Leather-Pre-Cut-Project-Piece-/112173155608?skus=Pre-Cut Size:12"x24"|Leather Weight:8/9oz&varId=412335028615 

it’s great for the price and is very  consistent in size. 

I would always go with 8/9 oz for fold over sheaths, and for layered sheaths I would try to get it the same width as the blade. You want it tight! 

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Dammit :( after reading a little about leather crafting, most poeple do not recommend bellies for sheath making because that part is stretchy and uneven. Last week, I asked my leather supplier for a suitable leather for that purpose and they proposed me any part including the belly. Since it was cheaper and smaller (6-7 sf) I ordered one. 

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I use shoulders and they work great.  They don't stretch out and you can tool and carve into them (hence the name "tooling shoulder")

Edited by Wes Detrick

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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1 hour ago, Wes Detrick said:

I use shoulders and it they work great.  They don't stretch out and you can tool and carve into them (hence the name "tooling shoulder")

Thanks Wes. Guess I'll have plenty of practice with the crappy belly leather :lol:

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On 10/14/2017 at 8:55 PM, Joël Mercier said:

Thanks Wes. Guess I'll have plenty of practice with the crappy belly leather :lol:

I've made somethings out of belly leather.  I wouldn't say it is not worth making your sheath out of as long as it is the right weight. (Thickness)  Give it a try and see how it goes :)

 

-Brian

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