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      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  

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Gezell

I skimmed through some of that site you sent the link for, it talks about annealing and normalizing. I don't think I have a set up capable of those things. I work with a coal forge and have a quench tank. Can I just forge my knife and quench it and be ok or do I have to do the normalizing and annealing ? Or what is the purpose of those to steps?

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Normalizing is important when you forge a blade because forging modifies grain size and spread carbides unevenly. Normalizing cycles will fix that and also reduce the odds of warping during the quench. That's what books and the folks here told me.

Edited by Joël Mercier

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I should have given you this link first... This explains what each process does.

http://www.cashenblades.com/heattreatment.html

I consider normalizing and thermal cycling (that is, multiple normalizations with descending heats) essential for a forged blade, as this refines the grain and puts the steel in an ideal state for hardening.  Annealing serves only one purpose, to make the steel soft enough to drill and file easily.  The only time I anneal is if I'm having trouble drilling holes in a full tang, otherwise I rarely bother with it.

Your difficulty with your equipment will be judging temperature.  One thing that will help is the old magnet trick.  Steel looses its magnetism at approximately 1420°, which is about 80° below the ideal temperature for hardening.  It will put you at the low end of the ballpark...

One other thing that will help is a phenomena known as decalescense.  When the temperature reaches the steel's happy place, a phase change begins to occur within the steel, and it requires energy to happen.  Energy that was being radiated as light starts being used elsewhere, thus the steel, instead of glowing brighter as the temperature increases, will stop glowing brighter until the phase change is finished at which point it begins glowing brighter as the temperature increases again.  What this looks like is a little hard to describe... As the temperature increases the steel gets brighter until it begins to change, and then it appears to not be getting brighter, and then, starting at the thinner parts (the edge and point) suddenly start getting brighter again while the thicker sections lag behind like shadows.  When the shadows are gone, quench.  It's only possible to see it in near darkness, but it is a surefire way to know the steel is hot enough to quench.

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I thought 1080A was 80crv2 ?! It was listed as such on alpha for the longest, but is identical in composition to 80crv2... at least thats what a trusted fella told me

Edited by Gabriel James

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I think they were calling it 1080+... I notice they're calling it 80crv2 now.

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I think the letters a, b, and c after a steel name stand for Annealed, Blanchard ground and Cold rolled.

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