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Chef's Knife - pattern welded


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I managed to destroy a piece of steel while twisting (bad weld) and got pissed to such an extent I decided to put that project on a temporary hold and make a chef's knife out of the scraps.

Here is the result. :)

Hvass Torn-1.jpg

Hvass Torn-2.jpgHvass Torn-3.jpg

The pattern welded steel is 15 layers of twisted railroad and railroad-plates steel, and the edge steel is Øberg-steel. Hardness at edge: 58HRC

Handle materials are: What kind of wood is that burl..? Anyone? + Holly, vulcanized fiber, silver tinn, and buffalo horn.

NOTE: If you look towards the edge - notice a crack in the edge steel. It does not continue into the pattern welded steel though - so it will not impact the performance of the knife I think - but still... Not sure if I can sell this one. Perhaps at 50% discount? ... I already have 3x cracked cooking knives in my kitchen.. I really don't need to add another one.

Note to self: Don't quench oil-hardening steels in water - even if it is an interrupted quench with water - oil - water - oil... :P

Any critique is most welcome. :D

 

Sincerely, Alveprins.

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Beautiful work! The handle is gorgeous. I cant imagine how much work went into it. Shame about the crack but hopefully you can  get some enjoyable use out of it.

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It is a beautiful knife!

I can suggest to quench in hot oil even blades forged of steels dedicated to be hardened in water. With thin cross sections (and knives or swords are ratehr thin) hot oil will do the job :) I worked it out by many cracks :lol:

 

And that burl is quite alike black locust burl. Enclosed my hunter handle with horribly 'misslined' pins ;P

Black locust burl hunter handle.JPG

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37 minutes ago, David Forsman said:

Beautiful work! The handle is gorgeous. I cant imagine how much work went into it. Shame about the crack but hopefully you can  get some enjoyable use out of it.

Thanks! Actually I sold it to one of my Facebook followers at 50% discount because of the crack. He had been wanting a knife from me for some time - and I suppose this was within the price range. :) I am shipping it tomorrow as soon as I've sharpened it. The etch takes quite a toll on the edge! :D

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16 minutes ago, Kris Lipinski said:

It is a beautiful knife!

I can suggest to quench in hot oil even blades forged of steels dedicated to be hardened in water...

Ordinarily I've quenched in food oil - but it seems that removing frozen water from the oil-bucket in winter has changed the properties of the oil - thus an earlier blade turned out a bit softer that I expected. So - I thought I'd do an interrupted quench with a quick quench in water, then over to oil... But - as you can see - it didn't work out as I planned.

I will be making a new quench tank this weekend - and filling it with Hydraulic oil as I've heard people use that... :)

 

I will have to look up that burl of yours. Looks interesting.

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Please don't use hydraulic oil.. if you want a better quenchent buy quench oil McMaster Carr 11 would work for most things in a pinch and is not all that expensive or order 5 gallons of quench 50 (former parks 50) from maxim 

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I currently use extreme temp hydraulic oil with some used motor oil mixed in for good measure. Works for me but then again im not selling knives at this point so nailing the heat treat is not as critical for me. Im also working in 5160 and 80crv2, both very forgiving on the heat treat process

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Fumes, and to a much lesser extent heavy metals, but also used motor oil especially absorbs water from the air over time, making a very unpredictable quench.  Real quench oil smells bad as well, but you know what you're getting.  That's why many people use canola/rapeseed oil.  It's cheap, plentiful, and doesn't smell bad while being a pretty good medium-speed oil at the same time.

I use vet-grade mineral oil,  which is the base for most industrial quench oils, because it doesn't smell bad, it doesn't go rancid, and it doesn't attract mice.  I will be switching to real oil soon since I scored five gallons of Parks AAA, unused, for cheap.  It was literally made for O1 and 5160.

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