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Rusty


Zeb Camper

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"Rusty" is not completed yet, I still have to peen the tang, but today's lighting seemed to be just right for pictures. I played alot with patinas, etching, rust blueing, used gnarly wrought for the guard and pommel. I am pleased with the results so far. I still have a few minor touchups to do. Critiqing is always welcome :D

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Edited by Zeb Camper
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20170925_185557.jpg Zeb, so I got to ask what am I looking at here???

 

 

It appears that you split the through tang and peened it as two pieces to the pommel! Is that correct?? Where are the specs on this one, inquiring minds want to know, blade material, length . I think I know what the handle material is but, let me know!!  Love the shape and flow of the knife itself!

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C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Well, the tang wasn't supposed to look like that. I did it out of despiration. I wasn't sure if I could peen the tang into a dome as a hole, so I cut it into an M shape. It sort of had cat's ears at this point. Then I focused my ball peen right in the valley until I had made the ears droop. From there I just peened away until both halves were domed. "The specs" were thrown out the window once I started forging. I got close to what I wanted to see, but didn't really nail it.  handle material is brush camo G10. The blade it's self is 1075 (I had some left from the katana). It does have a hamon. I am not absolutely sure about blade length, I can't find my tape measure. I think it is about 9 1/2". The handle is around 4 1/2". The handle was supposed to look like a knife I did a year or two ago, (this knife is for the same customer) but I didn't have enough thickness to achieve it, so I then threw that out. I'll post a picture of that.

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Edited by Zeb Camper
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And thanks for the complements. If you have any questions about how I achieved any of the patinas, or the rust blueing, or anything else just ask. I really am happy with the results of all that. I was pretty much trying every expeiramental aproach I could to get all the metal to match the handle elements. I am putting it all in my play book for sure:D

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I like!

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James Helm - Helm Enterprises, Forging Division

 

Come see me at the Blade Show! Table 26R.

 

Proud to be a Neo-Tribal Metalsmith scavenging the wreckage of civilization.

 

My blog dedicated to the metalwork I make and sell: http://helmforge.blogspot.com/

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16 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Well, the tang wasn't supposed to look like that. I did it out of despiration. I wasn't sure if I could peen the tang into a dome as a hole, so I cut it into an M shape. It sort of had cat's ears at this point. Then I focused my ball peen right in the valley until I had made the ears droop. From there I just peened away until both halves were domed.

Sometime a desperate correction ends up looking really good. I'd say you increased the mechanical advantage of the peen as well.

Do 'em that way from now on and just tell folks that's your patented cat ear peen.

Great knife overall.

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I like no matter the reason!! Two thumbs up!!

Edited by C Craft
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C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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21 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

 If you have any questions about how I achieved any of the patinas, or the rust blueing, or anything else just ask. I really am happy with the results of all that. I was pretty much trying every expeiramental aproach I could to get all the metal to match the handle elements. I am putting it all in my play book for sure:D

I love the lines of this knife! Okay, I'll ask. How did you get your rust blue to be that deep of a color ?

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10 hours ago, Shmuel said:

I love the lines of this knife! Okay, I'll ask. How did you get your rust blue to be that deep of a color ?

Thanks guys! Glad you like it. Shmuel, here was my process on the fittings:

1: mix 16oz. Hydrogen peroxide with 12oz. White vinegar in a spray bottle, add 2 tsps of salt. 

2: heat up the ETCHED fittings in the forge to a few hundred degrees.

3: spray with the solution until the parts are cold

4: repeat 3-5 times until the rust is thick.

5: heat to a low red heat for a few minutes, let cool to black heat

6: dunk in oil. 

another more traditional way of doing it is to boil the rust for 45 minutes in water. It leaves more of a black/brown finish Where this method leaves a purple/brown finish.

For the blade:

1:sand to 2,000 grit

2: polish with fast orange hand soap

3: etch in ferric chloride 

4: remove oxide with 2,000 grit, and fast orange

5: Heat the blade in the forge (a few fast passes past the mouth) spray with the same home made rusting agent until cold

6:repeat until the rust is thick

7: put on rubber gloves, get a rag wet with pure ferric chloride. Have your windex handy!

8: rub the rust off of the primary bevel of the blade, but leave it kind of sloppy around the edges. Blast with windex, and do the other side. Be fast! Sand the oxides off the primary bevel, but gently, focus on the hamon area only.

9: heat the blade again, but not very hot, and do one more spraying

10: Temper the blade (seems to make the patina pretty tough)

11:Oil the blade while hot.

Thats it!

 

Edited by Zeb Camper
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