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Atmospheric vs blower burners


Chad Brown

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There is a lot of discussion on the forum about this, so definitely search for older threads. Generally speaking atmospheric tends to be cheaper to build (fewer parts), quieter to run, but more difficult to finely tune.  It also can run without electricity.  Blown has the advantage of easier control, and efficiency can be optimized, especially with something like a ribbon burner.  

Definitely read these 2 threads at least:  Atmospheric and Blown.  

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For the record, I've built both and still have them both hooked to forges.  My venturi gets FAR more use.  The blown is just the long tube for HT of sword length items, and some day I will replace that with the 55 gallon drum simpler version, and probably a venturi burner.  They are so much quieter, and forge welding temps are not a problem.  My current set-up always does run a little rich though, so it isn't the most fuel efficient (but not oxidizing in the forge, so there is that).  

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I am also new on the Forum but I made the leap from charcoal to propane nearly a decade ago when I bought a single burner venturi from Chile Forge. It was the cheapest option at the time and also the quickest. If I was in or closer to big city I would have acquired the parts and built my own. I have no problem with my forge being able to keep with me. As Jerrod Miller points out, run a bit rich it is easy to limit oxidation.

I lack the experience with a blown unit to be a fair judge or even talk honestly about the advantages of one over the other. I know that I don't depend on an electrical outlet.

All I can say honestly is that it was a huge step up from charcoal for making the 3-6 (rarely larger] inch monolithic (single steel) blades I make. I was on a tight budget and didn't have ready access to the DIY parts sources.

If I made my own damascus I don't know which I would choose. 

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No need to be in a big city to source materials.  

1st you normally have to buy in large quantities, 25 feet for ceramic blanket, 55 # for castable refractories and Plistix or Metrikote.  I sell small  quantities like you would need to build a gas forge at affordable prices.  I ship all over the world..

Check out the Build a Gas Forge and Ribbon Burner attachments on the Forge Supplies page at www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com.

Let me know if I can help you.  I prefer contact by e-mail.

Wayne

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Wayne Coe
Artist Blacksmith
729 Peters Ford Road
Sunbright, Tennessee
706-273-8017
waynecoe@highland.net
www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com

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2 hours ago, Wayne Coe said:

No need to be in a big city to source materials.  

1st you normally have to buy in large quantities, 25 feet for ceramic blanket, 55 # for castable refractories and Plistix or Metrikote.  I sell small  quantities like you would need to build a gas forge at affordable prices.  I ship all over the world..

Check out the Build a Gas Forge and Ribbon Burner attachments on the Forge Supplies page at www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com.

Let me know if I can help you.  I prefer contact by e-mail.

Wayne

I think that is great. I made my choice a long time ago BUT, I have a strange acqusition at my shop that I latched onto way back then, in case I had to DYI, and still have it searching for a use. It may go to a larger forge or a heat treating, controlled temp furnace. I may be contacting you.

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