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Type XVI


Michael Bergstrom
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Hello, kind of new in this forum, I've lurked for a little while but have found myself lost in other forums, and frankly, I'm very shy about my work. 

 However, I wanted to share my latest sword. It's a Type XVI with a hollow ground pommel for a customer. I didn't base it off once piece but took inspiration from several museum pieces. It's a 46 inch long sword with 35.25" blade. Pommel is hollow ground and filed. Fittings are mild steel heat blued than chemical blue topper that I brushed back to a dull grey with the heat blue shimmering through. Handle is Wenge wood, with inlaid twisted copper wire, bordered with tooled and dyed leather sealed with boiled linseed oil (pics were taken soon after, it darkened to near black by the next day). Peen block is brass. Blade is 6150. Weight is 3lbs 12 ounces with a POB of 3.5 inches.  This was my 3rd sword I've made (unless you count the swiss degen, than 4th). 

 

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:rolleyes:Oh yah, sure, he can make a sword but can he make it "TACTICAL"?

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Great job. No need to be shy when you have one of those- they make other people shy.

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Nice work! I particularly like the linear decoration on the pommel-- it's subtle but classy. What tool did you use for those grooves?

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No need to be shy regardless of skill level. But for you, your skill looks quite refined, I love this sword I'm really looking forward to see more of your work. I love the pommel btw.

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47 minutes ago, Adam Betts said:

Nice work! I particularly like the linear decoration on the pommel-- it's subtle but classy. What tool did you use for those grooves?

I laid down the initial with a thin cutting wheel on a dremel, then deepened and refined with files. 

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5 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Yeah, no need to be shy. Your work is great! Please keep sharing! I like how it isn't perfect. It has a really natural hand made look. Which in my eyes is perfect. You should be proud. 

That's where my style is slowly going. I dislike the perfect machined look, especially after handling some orginals. Picking up a piece that is hundreds or even thousands of years old, looking at the work and recognizing what happened, both through use and creation, it makes you really connect with these creators and warriors that lived so long ago, they come to life again. I want my work to embody both new and old, the clash of defined and undefined. Something really sparked in me after my Europe trip and arctic fire 2016. I understand where I wanted to go, my journey is ongoing; the knowledge forever incomplete; but for right now at the least, my compass is pointed. 

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outstanding. That is great. I am a fan of this sword. Great work.

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Guys --

Michael, if you didn't know, is the guy who volunteered his professional video production company to film and broadcast Arctic Fire 2016.  He's a great guy.  He literally brought hundreds of thousands of dollars of video equipment to my place, and two of his guys to act as camera men for the better part of a week (sleeping in a closet under the stairs in my house on a blow up mattress ala Harry Potter) just because he digs the craft.

I have held this sword just before he did the final finish and peen. It's got a great feel.  The pivot points and balance are nice. It feels light and quick.

Great job, Michael! And the guys are right . . . post more stuff here, for sure!

Dave

 

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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