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while attempting to forge a rat tail on a knife i left the tang in the fire too long and melted it off is there any way to salvage this as i have already profiled the blade shape and bevels

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You could MIG weld a new tang on depending on where /how much of it burned. A photo might help..?

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ill try and get a photo up in a few hours after I get home and some sleep but the idea was to make a simple knife handle by bending the elongated tang back around to the blade hilt and making a final much like the picture below from google images not my knife

6cfcab7e6d95245efa7ef07060ae9c75--kitchen-knives-hand-made.jpg

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You could weld on an extension, and then forge it back into shape.  The weld would essentially disappear after forging.

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well I don't have access to a welding machine anymore but I was worried that a weld might induce undue stress points due to the composite metals

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If you can get it hot enough to melt you can get hot enough to forge weld.

I'd consider making a tang piece with a "V" or a dado and slipping the blade in it, heavily fluxing, and forge welding it.

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Also, do not harden your tang.  Soft (i.e. normalized) steel should have not problems with pretty much any standard steel you weld with.  As in if you used 1080 for your knife and welded on a mild (or 1080, but why would you do that?) tang with mild wire or high strength wire, as long as you welded properly and left it normalized you should have to problems.  If you used hard-facing or similar wire/rod you could have problems.  Since that is a moot point for you anyway, I would think that if you can get the forge weld to stick, you definitely won't have problems with the normalized tang.  

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Here’s a picture of the knife as it stands now after the tang melted haven’t gotten anymore time in the forge yet

image.jpg

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You've got tons of material left to work with. Forge-weld a tang extension and rework the tang.

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You've got plenty of material in the ricassso area you could draw out into your tang. If you have a straight or cross pein hammer learn to use the pein end to help with drawing out.

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or you could be ruthless and chuck it. If I burned carbon steel I would remove the burned section(at least) or discard the whole knife (most likeley). Its often not worth persuing somthing that is likly to have failure written into it......burning carbon steel pretty much trashes it, often oxidisartion at the grain boundries and carbon loss, very likly to have cracking problems....

 somtimes chucking it is the best option and put the time into somthing new .

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Owen the sad part is I decided to preside this knife after watching your video where you flatten the tang near the blade to create the finger guard

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