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Geoff Keyes

OT damascus shotgun barrels

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I picked up a  damascus double shotgun barrel set over the weekend.  It's a pattern called  Crolle (I think) and our research leads us to think that they are from a Parker.  Here is my dilemma, I bought them with the intent of cutting them up for spacers and such, then I had the thought of building a steampunk, flintlock, coach gun.  Now I'm starting tho think they might have value to a collector (more than the few $ I paid).  

So what does the collective wisdom think?  Am I risking the wrath of the universe if I mess with them?

Just asking

Geoff

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Can you identify the shotgun they came from Geoff and what condition they are in, as that would be the place to start a value consideration. I am on a couple of forums that have very knowledgable members for this type of enquiery

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They appear to be Parker from about 1923-24, so pre Remington.  There are some other marks, and I've joined a the Parker shotgun forum to see what I can find out.  29 7/8th inch barrel and it's either a 15 gauge (which seems unlikely) or a very worn (or over bored) 16 gauge.  The condition is fair, dirty and a couple of dents, the locking blocks are worn but would probably still work.  

Geoff

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I'd say too pretty and cool to cut up.  Then again, they would be awesome in anything you make with them and add that special touch there.  

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I picked up one with a simple twist pattern, went and did a ton of research on it, curious also to see if it could harden up at all (ended up testing that; nope, not really). Very little value so far as refurbishing or selling either, most folks say it's just a wall hanger. Unfortunately I didn't think to bookmark the research I did. I'm keeping mine for general fittings 

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I thought the were 16ga, and got several people excited.  It turns out they are 12ga and not so cool.  At first I was thinking ferrules and other things (shotgun wedding rings :lol:).  Now I'm thinking that I could make a cut-n-shoot flinter coach gun, and maybe a side-by-side howdah pistol.  Not to shoot, really, though I guess you could sleeve them down to .500, but just for the fun of making them.

Geoff

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If I were you, I would ask Steve Culver about them. He is kind of an expert about this sort of thing.

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Or, maybe you could split and flatten them out, and make san mai with them and a hardenable core!

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I have a couple of damascus shotgun barrels I want to make into san mai blades. Am I right in thinking that they are silver brazed together, and I can just sweat them apart in a gas forge, split the individual barrels with a slitting disc on an angle grinder, and forge them flat?

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They're usually just soft soldered.  Cool enough that they've been known to fall apart in a hot bluing tank.

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Jake,  

a propane torch and a wedge are all you need to progressively lift out the soft-soldered ribs. Melt a bit, wedge apart, melt a bit more, slide the wedge , repeat. Once the ribs are out then you can repeat the technique for separating barrels from each other and the spacer blocks.

There should be videos on You-tube about re-soldering loose ribs, and as the first step is to remove the rib completely  . . .

 cheers,

Tony

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