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Burner Placement

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I would have liked to see some follow up from Mr. Linner - how did he finally make out, was the three burner set up overkill, did he use more wool? This thread is somewhat frustrating because the only thing it answers is that there are no real answers. 

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3 hours ago, GPrimmer said:

I would have liked to see some follow up from Mr. Linner - how did he finally make out, was the three burner set up overkill, did he use more wool? This thread is somewhat frustrating because the only thing it answers is that there are no real answers. 

I have 2 burners in a standard propane tank. Once up to temp I cant turn it down enough to stay under 1500* with both burners. I have 2" of wool and about 1/4" of cast o lite.(thicker on the forge floor to make a level surface)

With both burners I can easily hit welding temps...in fact a few months ago I melted part or my burner tip and had to replace it.

forge.jpg

f1.jpg

Edited by Kreg

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3 hours ago, GPrimmer said:

 the only thing it answers is that there are no real answers. 

On the contrary, what this thread does is demonstrate there are many ways to get the job done, and all of them have positives and negatives.  There is no perfect forge for everyone, but a lot of people have built the ideal one for their own needs.  Or as close as it's possible to approach the ideal, anyway.  

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3 hours ago, GPrimmer said:

 This thread is somewhat frustrating because the only thing it answers is that there are no real answers. 

To the contrary, there are many answers because there are many questions.  

There are many paths to creating a forge because a) there are many different ways one can do it. b) there are many different purposes and goals for a forge c) different people have different preferences. D) different materials are available to different people.

There are too many people in our society today who are of the mindset that says "There must be one final perfect answer:"  A "best" if you will. They apply that to may things both tangible and intangible. In bladesmithing and knifemaking it is often seen as, "best" grinder, anvil, forge, steel, Rockwell hardness, edge grind etc. If they would break out of that rigid thinking pattern they would see that all of the choices exist precisely because there is no "best" . There are too many variables in life and in knifemaking for anything to hold that title in any facet.

This thread is a perfect example. There are many answers and it puts the responsibility on the reader to assimilate the knowledge, assess their needs and accept the responsibility for their choice with no one handing them the "perfect" answer. Many threads, on this forum, on many topics are like this. Different people have different approaches and very, very often you see, "what works for me..." or "I tried..." with rarely a real argument because there is a collective divestment of ego that comes along with the realization, as Grandpa would say, That, "there's more than one way around the bush".

 

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On 6/27/2018 at 12:48 PM, Alan Longmire said:

On the contrary, what this thread does is demonstrate there are many ways to get the job done, and all of them have positives and negatives.  There is no perfect forge for everyone, but a lot of people have built the ideal one for their own needs.  Or as close as it's possible to approach the ideal, anyway.  

I agree 100%

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On 6/27/2018 at 9:17 AM, GPrimmer said:

I would have liked to see some follow up from Mr. Linner - how did he finally make out, was the three burner set up overkill, did he use more wool? This thread is somewhat frustrating because the only thing it answers is that there are no real answers. 

Hello sir,

I have actually been way to busy this past spring and summer traveling for work and pleasure and have not completed the project. Now after seeing this subject revived I may finish it this weekend and post up some pics if I can get it completed. Now my garage has A/C it will be very comfortable to work in the there. :-)

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I'm still assembling my forge too... you were asking the same questions I'm running into.  I hope to have mine all done this weekend now that I have all the parts and necessary tools. Unless, of course, the wife has something more pressing for me to do. 

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Just now, GPrimmer said:

I'm still assembling my forge too... you were asking the same questions I'm running into.  I hope to have mine all done this weekend now that I have all the parts and necessary tools. Unless, of course, the wife has something more pressing for me to do. 

I hear you there my friend, seems my projects get pushed as well.

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Nope, still no time to finish this weekend. Oh well, maybe this week.

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If I may point something out for the sake of those building a forge.

Kreg mentioned melting a burner tip. IMO that is one of the potential problems of a 12:00 burner placement. You are putting the plumbing at precisely the hottest spot in the forge. And it doesn't matter if you keep the burner out of the forge the heat will find it. Side mounting allows you to keep the burner back where it is better protected. 

 

Edited by Vern Wimmer
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So started working on my forge again and I'm running into a few issues I would love some advice on and thank you in advance.

1. I'm building a round forge but would like a flat platform inside of the forge where I set the work piece to be heated.

2. How do I go about this flat platform/bottom of the inside of the forge?

3. Do I use the fire bricks that are shown in the photos and use more wool to fill in the gaps on the sides of the bricks and then use the high temp coating on top of that?

4. Or do I just take out the bricks and build up the bottom with wool and try to get it as flat as I can?

 

JL

Forge.jpg

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I would build up the floor with wool and use a hard refractory coating. It would take forever to get the bricks up to temp and would be a gas hog because of them.

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What Jeremy said.  The real question is, why do you think you need a flat spot to put your work on?   What's wrong with the bottom of the forge?

 

g

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1 hour ago, Geoff Keyes said:

What Jeremy said.  The real question is, why do you think you need a flat spot to put your work on?   What's wrong with the bottom of the forge?

 

g

Good point, I guess I'm not sure why I want a flat spot... hmmm

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Is anyone familiar with this brand, I checked the website to see mixing ratio's but there is no info on there site.

0.jpg

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Ok, just 2 questions to ask today.

1. How much refractory cement can you add to a forge, I mean whats the max thickness?

2. How do you mix the ITC-100?

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You can add as much refractory cement as you want over refractory blanket, but you only need a little.  More than 1/4" generally becomes very hard to rationalize (more cement = more strength, but what on Earth do you need that much for!?).  The ITC-100 is just mixed to a thin slurry (pancake batter is often referenced, but it can be thinner with more coats applied).  Anything refractory gets harder to cure as it gets thicker.  You must drive the water out slowly.  

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1 hour ago, Jerrod Miller said:

You can add as much refractory cement as you want over refractory blanket, but you only need a little.  More than 1/4" generally becomes very hard to rationalize (more cement = more strength, but what on Earth do you need that much for!?).  The ITC-100 is just mixed to a thin slurry (pancake batter is often referenced, but it can be thinner with more coats applied).  Anything refractory gets harder to cure as it gets thicker.  You must drive the water out slowly.  

Awesome Jerrod, I appreciate that info brother. 

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Advice is awesome and as always much appreciated.  JL

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Nobody, no advice or anything? lol

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Add refractory cement.  How's that?

Looks like you aren't getting the blue flame that you want.  Play with your air/fuel mix to get there.  

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Thanks Jerrod

What consistency should I mix the cement? And just mix with water?

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12 minutes ago, Kreg said:

I tried to use as little water as possible to make the slurry. Mine was similar to crete or tile thinset

Perfect, thank you Kreg.

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