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So my machine shop told me they have some "tool steel" that they'll never use and if I didn't take it, it would be going in the scrap pile.  Today I stopped by to see what they have.  Here's what I'm getting.  Looks to be mostly O1, but also some A2 and a little D2.  Sizes as marked.  Can't beat the price....this will keep me busy for a while!  I have to learn about these various steels.  Trying to think of a good item to make from all those 3/16" x 1/2" A2 pieces.....

Warner

20171116_093528.jpg

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Best thing for that A2 is probably eBay.  It is not forge friendly or easy to HT.  It is expensive though, so you can get some capital for other tools/supplies!  

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2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Best thing for that A2 is probably eBay.  It is not forge friendly or easy to HT.  It is expensive though, so you can get some capital for other tools/supplies!  

Kind of what I was thinking.  Probably just the O1 is good for my purposes.  But yeah, I looked that stuff up and it's not cheap!   There are some nice pieces in there, too.

                  Warner

Edited by Warner Smith
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That's a massive score, good for you!

The maker where I did a course used a lot of D2 at some stage.

He does an air quench using 2 massive steel plates, he has a kiln and all that, not a simple steel to heat treat I believe.

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D2 isn't too bad for complexity.  Per the ASM Heat Treater's Guide:  Ideal is to heat it slowly to about 1500 F, then bring it up to about 1825 F (it lists 1795-1875, I recommend going the low side of middle on that).  Soak at temp for about 15 minutes, then evenly air cool (not listed in the book, but pretty much any time an air cool is called out you should be safe pressing between steel plates).  You can also salt quench it by going from the soak to 1000 F salt, just until the blade is evenly 1000 F, then air cool.  That should get you in the 62-65 HRC range.  Doing a minimum of 2 tempers at anything between 400 and 900 F will drop you a couple points (if you go at about 850 F you can convert some of the retained austenite and actually get it harder than at 600 F).  After 900 F the temper really starts dropping the hardness fast.  While that seems like a lot of stuff to keep in mind, it is pretty forgiving for exact times and temperatures.  If you are a little off from ideal, you're still getting pretty good results.  Not the first alloy I would choose to play with, but since you are going to have some anyway, why not play with it?  

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Nice score! I just was gifted a couple of nice A2 blocks that I intend to use for dies on a future power hammer build.....you might be able to use some of yours for punches for decorative work. You are quite the lucky man.

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Here's the total haul:

D2 - 1ea 5/8"x 1" x 12 1/2"

1ea 5/8"x 1 1/2" x 12 1/2"

1ea 1/4"x1 3/4" x 4 3/4"

1ea 3/8"x2" x 4 3/8"

1ea 1/2"x3/16" x 8 1/2"

************************************

A2- 141ea  3/16"x1/2" x 7 1/2"

A2 - 2ea 3/16"x1/2" x 9 1/2"

A2 - 49ea 3/16" x 3/4" x 7 1/2"

**************************************

O1 - 6ea 5/8"x2 1/2" x 18"

1ea 5/8"x2 1/2" x 5 3/4"

1ea 3/16"x3" x 14 1/4"

1ea 3/8"x1" x 10"

1ea 3/16"x1/2" x 13 3/4, 15 5/8, 18" (3 pieces listed here)

 1ea 1/16"x2" x 32 1/2"

1ea 1/16"x1/2" x 18"

1ea 1/8x1" x 18"

 

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