Jump to content

Where to get mild steel for welding?


Mike Ward

Recommended Posts

That stuff is unreliable content.  You want known materials, which will make your life way easier.  Machine shops will generally have 1018/1020, which is pretty good for the low carbon range.  For knives though, you may want to consider going with 2 blade steels that have a difference in Ni content to get great contrast.  15N20 and 1080/1084 are both blade alloys, weld together nicely, and show great contrast.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alright, where would I order these steels? So far I've been using mystery metal from springs and such.

And what about suggested size of the blanks? ( Width and thickness? I only have my arm for a motor and don't really want to be banging for a long time with little movement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

New Jersey Steel Baron is my go to now. 

Size will depend on what you want to end with. That is as much as I know about forging damascus. Except for cable which is a regional "must do":rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cable is not the easiest thing to forge weld.  You have to soak and burn the grease out of it and keep it twisted tightly.  I would follow Jerrod's recommendation on steel selection.  Start out with a stack that is about 6" long and about an inch thick.  If you really want a subtle pattern The New Jersey Steel Baron also sells 1045.  Look in the steel for damascus section.

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep.  Most people don't use mild steel in damascus, it lowers the overall carbon content more than most like.  That blend of 1084 and 15N20 is pretty foolproof, depending on the fool of course...:lol:  Both those alloys have similar carbon content and the same heat treat requiremens, so you won't lose carbon or worry about it coming apart in the quench.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The guys here are right on with their recommendations but  if you're just set on high carbon/low carbon then it's  important to factor in what your eventual carbon content will be after migration.  Use a high carbon steel that has excess carbon (like 1095) and calculate how much of it that you will need to compared to your amount of  low carbon to end up with a billet of .7%C or more when you are done.  As was said, you  won't get a high contrast like you would if you use a nickel content steel as your secondary.

Example:

High/Low Carbon--

moran damascus_opt

 

1084/15N20:

IMG_3117_opt

 

Gary

 

ABS,CKCA,ABKA,KGA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm studying to be a ME in college and I'm taking a class on engineering materials right now so I understand most of what you're saying. It makes sense that the low/high carbon want to try to reach equilibrium. But with the metals with higher nickel content, does the nickel content "block" the carbon diffusion of the 10xx steel? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Mike Ward said:

I'm studying to be a ME in college and I'm taking a class on engineering materials right now so I understand most of what you're saying. It makes sense that the low/high carbon want to try to reach equilibrium. But with the metals with higher nickel content, does the nickel content "block" the carbon diffusion of the 10xx steel? 

Pure nickel will  block the carbon migration but the 1-2% in a steel will not.

Gary

 

ABS,CKCA,ABKA,KGA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...