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Help picking out my next hammer


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As a Christmas present I am thinking about getting another hammer.

I currently have a 2.5lb cross pein, picked it up from Home Depot, and a smaller ball pein hammer and was wondering what would make a good compliment to that. 

I was thinking something in the 1 to 1.5 lb range but was a bit overwhelmed with the different styles.  Does the different pattern, I.E.  German or French or Nordic, make that much of a difference? 

Unfortunately a power hammer is right out. 

So any suggestions on what should be my next purchase would be helpful. 

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Well, I used to use a 4 lbs for pretty much everything. Now I use the 2.5 much more as well as a 3 and several assorted ball peens for more delicate work, and a vertical 4lb cross peen. If you can find a killer deal on some good ball peens of different weights, I wouldn't hesitate to pounce on it. 

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I am keeping my eye out for a good straight pein . 

You could get a double ender and dress each end for different effects. I have a 4 pounder, mainly from having used mystery steels, that I call my "power hammer" sometimes something just needs a good whopping. I am going to get around to putting a linear bevel, like a mild fuller/pein in case I ever get the urge to draw out another axle.

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3 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

............I use a wooden hoe handle alot to bend in recurves too. It's a very valuable tool.

I think the technical term is "thwacker" 

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I use a 42 oz estwing blacksmith hammer for everything (no I dident buy it just cause it said blacksmith) I bought it because I love estwing... yes it does have a fiberglass handle, but it has been great.

with the sizes you already have, I would go with something a bit heavier.

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Hammers are kind of tricky because everyone likes a different hammer for personal reasons. My wife and I went through a lot of hammers before we settled on ones that we like. Currently, I use only 2 hammers for 90% of all the forging work I do. The first is a Peddinghaus Swedish pattern (1000g) and the other is a 1.5 pound rounding hammer.

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Most will use a 2 lb cross peen the majority of  the time.  I also keep a 4 lb sledge mainly for pointing blades quickly.  Others  that are handy are those that have one domed face as well  as  a flat face.  Also angle  peens are very useful.

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Hammer faces need to be crowned a little or the corners dig in.
Rounding hammers have a dramatic crown on one face and a normal crown on the other.
The difference is the round drives material away from it differently than a square face hammer.
Really good black smiths will use the 5 parts of a hammer face for different things.
So the cheeks which are the two sides of the crown and chin and nose which are the top and bottom of the face and then the center.
This will allow you to draw or tuck into corners.
The idea of the drastic crown of a rounding hammer allows for drawing on the bick or the end of the anvil as long as  the anvil has been dressed properly.
 

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I bought more hammers than I need. Most used is a 3 pound, cast steel cross pein from Harbor Frieght for $8 and change. Then a 2 pound True Temper same design both long handles. Just acquired a 4.5 sawyers hammer but need to work on the handle.

Gary LT

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