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Jeremy Blohm

D2?

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http://www.steelexpress.co.uk/toolsteel/D2-Steel-properties.html

According to this D2 can be quenched in oil bit would you want to do this with something as thin as a knife. Its labeled as air hardening but can be oil quenched. Any input would be appreciated.

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I don't think that it is ever a good idea to quench a blade any faster than is necessary to get the job done.  If you get passed the nose of the cooling curve, and D2 will give you plenty of time, you shouldn't have any problems with crossing the pearlite start line.  Cooling fast can give problems with micro cracks developing where the plate martensite intersect so a slightly slower quench will have an advantage.  It would be something akin to marquenching 52100.

Doug

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Not that it directly applies but one thing I will NEVER try again is to take a piece of "recycled" (planer blade) D2 and try to anneal and work it. The proper annealing sequence is quite tight in specifics as is the heat treat and hardening, that is if you want to get the best out of the steel. 

I have observations from later experience.

It really moves like crap under the hammer and has a narrow "good" window heat-wise.

It makes great stock removal blades IF you are careful not to work harden it AND you have all of the neccessary heat treating capability to bring it to its best OR you are sending it out to somone who does and who knows D2

If anything is done at less than optimally, as far as heat treat, then it will not perform any better, if even as good, as much easier to work with steels. I might catch flack for this, but, IMHO, if you misstep with D2 in the slightest a comparable blade made from easy to work and heat treat 80CrV2 will perform better if done right and simply.

Many folks have asked me if I would use it because, like wire cable, it has a regional "cachet" or appeal due to the timber and sawmill industry. I don't do it because I would either have to send it out for HT and charge a lot for just the trouble of working it or "slap it together and blow smoke up their rear about what a great knife they just bought" . 

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1512237310504144791763.jpg

This was given to me and is probably all that i will ever work with of this steel with that said i might play around with it after doing my homework on it. I was surprised there was not a topic on this alloy. When done correctly it can make a nice knife and sending it out for heat treat is not off the table but i like to do things myself. I don't get the sense of accomplishment when i send work out! And for me that is a huge factor in how i feel about the finished product. Not that it changes the value its just how i feel about the subject.

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Sitting right on the table next to me is a D2 knife. It is wonderfully sharp stays so for a long time and I like it. Did I make it? No it's a factory job. If you already have a piece, by all means, put it to use. Just remember it is difficult to work with especially if it is already hardened. Many people have done it and have made beautiful excellent knives, it's just a lot of work. If it is annealed then it will be easier and, by outsourcing the HT , you can create quite a knife. 

 

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1512241981506872252393.jpg

I also got a few Henry rifle barrels also. Not sure what they are made of yet but its good old fashioned american steel! I think 2 are.45 LC or 45/70 gov. And the other is .30 cal.

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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The gun collector in me says if one of the barrels is close to .30.cal it is probably .312 for the 32/20 round. If they are older than the current Henry Repeating Arms corp then they are not "Henry barrels" since the that company only existed for a few years in the 1880s. They are most likely ones made by the Numrich corp in the late 1960s through early 80s for gunsmith conversions of Winchester rifles and single shot customs. Maybe .45 LC or 45/70 if not marked ".45" could be .44 actually .429

 

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I probably shouldn't have used the term "old fashioned" These are new production barrel but its something i think when talking about henry rifles kinda like talking about '60s muscle cars. 

These barrels are discards from a shop that grinds the flats on the octagon barrels for the current production henry rifles. One of them has a large gouge from not being square on the surface grinder or something like that. But any little flaw and the barrel is scrapped.

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Cool. Intetesting possibilities there. 

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A slightly educated guess would have them be 4340.  That's a popular steel for modern barrels, and despite the relatively low carbon that alloy does harden enough for blades.  Not as hard as high carbon, of course, but maybe Rc 55 or so, plus it's tougher than woodpecker lips.

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What would you guys do with the barrels? Try to do what Walter Sorrells did with the Enfield Mark III barrel?

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4 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

A slightly educated guess would have them be 4340.  That's a popular steel for modern barrels, and despite the relatively low carbon that alloy does harden enough for blades.  Not as hard as high carbon, of course, but maybe Rc 55 or so, plus it's tougher than woodpecker lips.

4340 has 1.65-2% Ni and 15n20 is 2% which makes me wonder how it welds?

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Go here.  

Walter Sorrels just got done making a knife with a gun barrel with a mild steel core.  He posted it on this forum talking about it. He has a few videos talking about how he did it.

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11 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

Go here.  

Walter Sorrels just got done making a knife with a gun barrel with a mild steel core.  He posted it on this forum talking about it. He has a few videos talking about how he did it.

It's funny because i watched that video and a couple days later when i was bringing an anvil to a friend he gave me these barrels.;)

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