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Jeremy Blohm

Hunting knife

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20171210_181926.jpg

This is my first post in the design and critique now that i can post pictures from my wifes phone.:)

I started this as a test to see if it would upload and decided to actually post. When i get back to the house i will get measurements.

52100 bearing steel. Im going to do my best to properly heat treat. 

Black locust handle. Not much character but extremely hard and durable. 

I plan on doing a brass or copper guard and pommel which will compliment the black locust because it ends up being a yellow color. If i cant find something to use i might try my hand at casting my own brass guard and pommel. If i fail at that (highly likely) i will make it out of mild steel. If i do mild steel for the guard im thinking i will use a wipe on gun blueing. 

This is going to be fo my dad to use as a hunting knife. Im using the black locust because its extremely hard and if i used something flashy or really nice he wouldn't use it!

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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Blade width: 1/8 inch

Blade length: 3 3/4 inches

Overall length: 8 1/4 inches

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I can't see on the pic which bevel grind you went for but it seems partial. I know the blade is only 1/8" thick but I believe the bevel should go at least 3/4 of the width. It may be just a personal preference though!

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21 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

I can't see on the pic which bevel grind you went for but it seems partial. I know the blade is only 1/8" thick but I believe the bevel should go at least 3/4 of the width. It may be just a personal preference though!

I did all of the rough shaping with files and finished it up with an small belt sander. 52100 is the hardest steel i have worked with to date and i kinda gave up and just finished it up.

Im working on getting everything set up. Right now i have a kalamazoo 6x48 3hp belt grinder but its 3 phase and i have to get a converter for it and i am building a 2x72 and all i need is a wheel set for it and it will be ready to go. But between buying guns anvils a new vehicle for the wife and fixing mine and building am addition on the shop im kinda strapped for cash but the other day i won this for 54 bucks on an online auction. Finally something i can plug in and run.2c2c7e222D20132D41612Db8f42D9d56b2a35734FILE33.JPG

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If i had to do it all over again i would have chosen another steel to work with. Im going to save 52100 for when i have my belt grinders up and running. The sparks from this steel is awesome though. More complex than any other steel i have worked with!

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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That grinder looks mighty handy for blades without ricassos and with nakagos if ya know what I mean :ph34r: Or, it would also be good for double edged blades.

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15 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

That grinder looks mighty handy for blades without ricassos and with nakagos if ya know what I mean :ph34r: Or, it would also be good for double edged blades.

For $54 i couldn't pass it up. Some of the stuff i have bought off this auction sight is unbelievable!:D the best deal so far was the 80 gallon 10 hp rotary screw compressor that produces 30 cfm @125psi for $185 ;)

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Nice catch!

52100 was my third "real" knife steel. I came to the conclusion that it has a mind of its own under the hammer and becomes the blade IT wants to be. :blink:

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6 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Nice catch!

52100 was my third "real" knife steel. I came to the conclusion that it has a mind of its own under the hammer and becomes the blade IT wants to be. :blink:

It moves like crap under the hammer. It reminded me of when I first started with the railroad track. A really small knife that took forever to hammer out!!!:(

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I don't do many small blades. But I have noticed that do to heat loss, the small blades take as long, or longer to forge compaired to a medium sized blade. A thicker spined 8" long blade holds more heat thus meaning more mileage from the first heat.

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1 hour ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

It moves like crap under the hammer. It reminded me of when I first started with the railroad track. A really small knife that took forever to hammer out!!!:(

 

1 hour ago, Zeb Camper said:

I don't do many small blades. But I have noticed that do to heat loss, the small blades take as long, or longer to forge compaired to a medium sized blade. A thicker spined 8" long blade holds more heat thus meaning more mileage from the first heat.

Yeah, I noticed that too. I wonder if pre-heating the anvil would help.

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3 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

 

Yeah, I noticed that too. I wonder if pre-heating the anvil would help.

I actually thought about going back to my RR track anvil. So I could really heat it up, when I was making small blades from 52100.

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2 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

I actually thought about going back to my RR track anvil. So I could really heat it up, when I was making small blades from 52100.

Not only dose 52100 cool fast in small blades but it has a narrow forging window.

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Probably due to the Cr content, like D2 and most stainless

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Back to the blade critique......The tang looks upturned above the blade spine, clamp a stop across that at the ricasso line and take an angle grinder to rough in the bevels (even a flap wheel will will do and you can graduate the grit on the flap wheels to ease the pain of hand finishing), you might want to raise the bottom edge of the ricasso a tad bit and drop the choil,  I wouldn't advise you to cast brass unless you have a very well ventilated shop and some serious PPE. If your decision to cast the guard is because you want a thick metal element before the wood, try a 1/4 inch guard and a 1/4 inch spacer separated with a very thin piece of colored paper or dyed leather. Looks great. (see pic below)

Personal opinion: I prefer a high contrast rather than a low contrast. Yellow wood and brass fittings is a low contrast (unless the brass gets a patina of some sort).You could also consider applying a stain or oil to the wood to change its coloration.

Ironwood Hunter.JPG

Edited by Joshua States

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I decided to man up and get to filing. Im going for a full flat have to clean it up some more but its getting there. After filing im cleaning up with a band file sander. Not ideal but works for finishing. Definitely not for stock removal.20171211_154623.jpg

Its hard to see the plunge line in the picture but the plunge line will be pushed back a little and the edge is getting thin so i might have to bring the edge up a little before heat treat.

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27 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

Back to the blade critique......The tang looks upturned above the blade spine, clamp a stop across that at the ricasso line and take an angle grinder to rough in the bevels (even a flap wheel will will do and you can graduate the grit on the flap wheels to ease the pain of hand finishing), you might want to raise the bottom edge of the ricasso a tad bit and drop the choil,  I wouldn't advise you to cast brass unless you have a very well ventilated shop and some serious PPE. If your decision to cast the guard is because you want a thick metal element before the wood, try a 1/4 inch guard and a 1/4 inch spacer separated with a very thin piece of colored paper or dyed leather. Looks great. (see pic below)

Personal opinion: I prefer a high contrast rather than a low contrast. Yellow wood and brass fittings is a low contrast (unless the brass gets a patina of some sort).You could also consider applying a stain or oil to the wood to change its coloration.

Ironwood Hunter.JPG

I like the idea of bringing the ricasso up. Makes it easier to sharpen the entire length of the blade. I have chosen not to go with the black locust. I am going to hunt down some burl instead. I have been asking my dads opinion every step of the way. I think he is starting to realize im making it for him.

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It's always a toss up on the ricasso. If there is too much space between the guard and the plunge you end up with a sharp corner that tends to hang up or snag when you are inside a critter. OTOH, like you said there is the sharpening thing. 

ETA: Joshua's knife shows the right proportions to eliminate the snag problem. I'll probably "biggerize" the pic to get his ratios for future reference:ph34r:

Edited by Vern Wimmer

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1 minute ago, Vern Wimmer said:

It's always a toss up on the ricasso. If there is too much space between the guard and the plunge you end up with a sharp corner that tends to hang up or snag when you are inside a critter. OTOH, like you said there is the sharpening thing. 

I was literally just about to mention that. I love exessive choilige myself. 

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You know what they say about a big choil^_^

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I like the design and critique. It gives me some incentive to do things i might not have done. Thanks for all the input everyone i think everything is going to look better than it would have if i didn't post it here.

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I forgot to mention this is my first hidden tang/through tang construction which is another reason i put it here 

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Since we are in the critique phase I would say, that if you haven't heat treated and hardened yet I wouldn't have made the shoulders where the tang meets the ricasso sharp 90 degree corners like that. When tempering sharp inside corners can become stress risers and invite cracking.

Edited by Vern Wimmer

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1 hour ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

I decided to man up and get to filing

:lol: Exactly what happened to me on my first knife. I got a good kick in the butt. Ended up with a much prettier knife than it was supposed to. 

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So instead of bringing to plunge line back into the ricasso bring the shoulders forward and round the corners? If that makes sense.

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