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Cuchillos de campo


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That lockback was getting me down, so I took a little break to make these  6DD69B6A-6B65-4491-8F9E-55D030968878.jpeg

In the past year I’ve become fascinated with South American knives since traveling there last winter/spring and these are my latest. I’ve previously made knives based off of the ones I saw out on ranches, used for everything from slaughtering livestock to carpentry. These are more like the ones I saw people wearing at the fiesta del arreo in Bahía Murta. B8B68E1E-A408-4E6D-8F65-A95EB7B2BC3F.jpeg

They are based on these originals (http://www.vikingsword.com/ethsword/facon/criollo.html), and in the typography where I found the image, the style is called “cuchillo de campo” (country/ranch knife). I would definitely recommend the article if you are interested in historic knives or gauchos. 

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The pinched bolsters were a real challenge. They are held by a single pin, so they have to be located using the top edge of the handle scales. I’m very happy with how they turned out. 

 

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The dark handle is bookmatched figured  walnut (with an unfortunate glitch in the top cutler’s rivet), and the lighter one is a scrap of laurel I got from a coffee farmer in Costa Rica. It’s a bit more subtle than the guanacaste I got from the same person, but I like the look. 

 

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The finish is a hand sanded 600 grit buffed with emery so it sheds water. 

 

Comments/questions are always welcome

Thanks for looking!

Edited by Aiden CC
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I like them a lot. Somewhere I have a tourist grade one with a Rockwell in the low 50s. I have a soft spot for knives that are cultural tools.

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Woow I really love these!

I like the brass bolsters and big rivets and how clean they are without a plunge line.

Are the tangs beveled at the angle of the blade?

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Beautiful work, has captured the essence of the field knife, that is one of the versions that I like most !!. as a detail to the link that you have placed, Abel Domenech, is the highest authority in Creole knives, and is author among others of an exciting book that is called "del facon al bowie" where he develops the parallel evolution of the bowie and the facon, as descendants of the Mediterranean dagger. very interesting and full of the history of that knife in our country, cordial greetings, leonardo

 

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On 1/2/2018 at 10:29 PM, Sam w said:

Really like these mate. Just wondering some dimensions thanks, especially how thick

Thanks! Both are 0.130" thick at the bolster, based on the knives I saw in Chile and on the picture below. They also both have a distal taper down to about 0.090" before the taper to the tip starts.

criollo09.jpg

These are the other dimensions:

Walnut handled one:

-8 7/8" long blade

-1 1/2" wide at the heel

-13 5/8" overall length

 

Laurel handled one:

-9 3/8" long blade

-1 3/4" wide at the heel

-14 1/4" overall length

 

On 1/3/2018 at 3:57 AM, pieter-pauld said:

Woow I really love these!

I like the brass bolsters and big rivets and how clean they are without a plunge line.

Are the tangs beveled at the angle of the blade?

Thanks Pieter! The tangs are beveled at the same angle as the blades. I really like to do knives that way for a few reasons. First, its often how they were done historically. It also gives a very clean look like you mentioned, as well as removing a fair amount of weight from the handle. It also means I don't have to polish a plunge cut, which is very nice. It does make handle construction difficult, especially with bolsters, but I've worked out a method.

 

22 hours ago, peter fontenla said:

Beautiful work, has captured the essence of the field knife, that is one of the versions that I like most !!. as a detail to the link that you have placed, Abel Domenech, is the highest authority in Creole knives, and is author among others of an exciting book that is called "del facon al bowie" where he develops the parallel evolution of the bowie and the facon, as descendants of the Mediterranean dagger. very interesting and full of the history of that knife in our country, cordial greetings, leonardo

 

Thanks! I may have to look into his book. 

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