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Very simple beginners propane forge!!!


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This one looks like it would be easy to modify to a longer hose. It appears to have a compression fitting at the hose so that can be easily changed.

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Indeed.  If I could find the person who spread the idea that sand and plaster make a good refractory I'd make him wear kaowool underpants...  if I had my way, that is.  Getting plaster that hot just t

Here is the link to the video. I hope this helps anyone who wants to get into this craft and dose not have a lot of resources such as welders and steel. The reason I used the hard brickbis because i h

I'm in the process of uploading a video to YouTube and I will post a link to it.

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15 hours ago, Adam C. said:

1) the forging God's want me to stick with charcoal.

The forging God's want this to work and so do we. It will run and you will be banging steel in a clean manner and not covered in black soot and smelling like a bbq.:lol:

Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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The forging God's are fickle beings! 

Swung by my local hardware store and got the orifice needed. Huzzah!

Was able to heat up some 1075 and start working a tip in to test heat up time between forgings. Only issue is I believe the orifice wasn't tapped straight. But it still was able to crank out the heat needed.

After some light forging I turned off the gas to let it cool down to bring back inside. Came back out for a smoke and found the supply line (braided stainless steel) made for propane cookers had melted at the connection from the brass female swivel flare connection. Apparently it was only a hard fitting. The radiant heat from the bricks melted the Barb connection. 

Such is life.

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"Insulation" is not just for making the heating more efficient. It keeps the heat where you want it and away from where you don't want it.

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This is something I never talked about mainly because it has become second nature to pull the burner when im done forging but the soft fire brick would be better all around but not as easily found locally. This effect can also happen to a large forge. The burner acts as a chimney and allows the heat to escape through the burner and can also melt some plastic blowers on a blown burner forge.

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It's all lessons learned! I'm happy it worked! I have another hose lying around. I can also just rotate it on it's side. I'll begin the slow building of a better enclosed and insulated model here soon enough. 

Thanks for all the help. Hopefully, my issues will help others build theirs with few to no issues.

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After I build this and do some work with it i'm going to build one that a lot bigger with 2 propane burners.

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If I were to wrap the insides of this forge with Kaowool would more heat stay trapped in it?

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Alan is right. This design was for a quick solution for those without kaowool. If you have or plan to get kaowool then forget the bricks and search the threads on forges. Using bricks serves no purpose if you have kaowool. You can even use a one-gallon metal paint can.

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1 minute ago, Conner Michaux said:

Can you make a forge just with kaowool?

You need a rigid, metal, form or container to hold the kaowool and to attach the burner to. 

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A Freon bottle would be a great size for this.  Stop by your local mechanic shop or AC repair shop and they toils probably have one laying around. 

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I made a version of this using 9 bricks.  It worked fine for what I wanted to do with it which was heat treating 10XX steel.  But, it seemed to take a long time to come up to heat, maybe 15 minutes or a little more.  And it used a lot of propane.  So I bought a square foot of 1 inch insboard and a square foot of 1/2 inch insboard, and a quarter pint of ITC100.

Below is a link to the result.  It heated this big old file to temp in about 5-6 minutes at most.  I have about $150 in it all totaled up.

The dang thing is, I only intended to do heat treating with it.  But I have to admit, that roaring fire and the red hot steel is sexy.  I'm starting to have visions of being a man with a hammer in my hand one day soon.

 

https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipMIsHx6lsxcjeuA2p38qyTg52p67I8_8Z_egPNu

 

Edited by Finn Hill
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1 hour ago, Finn Hill said:

 

The dang thing is, I only intended to do heat treating with it.  But I have to admit, that roaring fire and the red hot steel is sexy.  I'm starting to have visions of being a man with a hammer in my hand one day soon.

 

https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipMIsHx6lsxcjeuA2p38qyTg52p67I8_8Z_egPNu

 

Another one is drawn to the flame!

BWAHAHAHAAA

 

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2 hours ago, Finn Hill said:

The dang thing is, I only intended to do heat treating with it.  But I have to admit, that roaring fire and the red hot steel is sexy.  I'm starting to have visions of being a man with a hammer in my hand one day soon.

Bladesmithing can be fairly easy to get into with some imagination and initiative. An anvil can be as simple as a granite block. Here is a good exampleof an improvised anvil.

download (2).jpeg

 

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2 hours ago, Finn Hill said:

I'm starting to have visions of being a man with a hammer in my hand one day soon.

Beware this craft can be extremely addictive. Many a smiths have faced divorce and many other tragic mishaps. Also can be very dagerous. Just ask the "smith" who burned down half of his town in upstate New York. 

Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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9 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

 

Beware this craft can be extremely addictive. Many a smiths have faced divorce and many other tragic mishaps. Also can be very dagerous. Just ask the "smith" who burned down half of his town in upstate New York. 

Addictive is a good word for it.  My wife is having a hard time understanding how the "I',m going to buy a couple of files and make a knife" turned into what it has.  I read about that guy that started the fire in New York.  An object lesson on just how horribly things can go wrong and something to remember for sure.

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45983dd72Dbb5e2D4fb12Dbb212Ddbef0b647553FILE20.JPG

Im tryimg to figure out how this one works. If i wasnt getting ready to buy a really nice anvil i would buy it for shi#$ and giggles to see how it works but im going to have to pass on this one. The bidding is at $14 and i need to save another hundred for this anvil so im passing. 

Im wondering if thats a small blower attached to the burner? We may never know.

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I'm thinking that's a thermostat control. Sort of a relative feel good control.

Don't think I've ever seen one of those with a blower. Folks seem to do a good job of getting in trouble with those without a blower.

 

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It's an auto shutoff timer. Most frustrating part of trying to fry a turkey is realizing you forgot to reset it and let it run out and cut off the gas. It's supposed to be for safety but I feel the absolute least safe when I'm reaching around hot metal with a stick lighter under a couple gallons of 325 degree oil because the %^#*ing timer ran out.

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  • 1 month later...

My latest mini forge with turkey fryer burner. Freon bottle body. Nutec max wool hps lining with Kast-o-lite coating from Wayne Coe. Thank you again Wayne!!!20180328_193136.jpg20180328_193913.jpg20180328_193714.jpg

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The wife and I went shopping not long ago and one of the places we went had a fairly good sized fire extinguisher on the wall. I added that to my list of possible bodies for a second forge. Someday I'll be in the right place and it will all fall in place.

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