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I've been obsessing over this lately, and plan on running some experiments to acieve different colored patinas like copper oxide 1 (red), and 2 (black), as well as copper carbonate (green), and copper sulphate (blue). 

Here are some processes I have gathered so far. 

This one is theoretical: 

Create simple copper carbonate by spraying on a rust solution until thick and green and then heat (boil?) to acheive oxide 1 (red), and heat higher for oxide 2 (black). 

This is based on known experiments based on Benedict's test:

Mix 16 oz hydrogen peroxide and 12 oz. of white venager and a teaspoon of table salt. Spray it on and let it dry in cycles to create copper carbonate (the green patina).

Heat the copper carbonate to create copper oxide 2.

Heat some hydrochloric acid (slightly) and add the black oxide to create copper sulfate (the blue stuff).

Make a mixture of sodium carbonate, and sodium citrate, in distilled water with plenty of sugar. Add the part and bring the solution to a boil until the copper sulfate turns to copper oxide I (red). 

Here's another method for the red copper oxide 1

(A)Cupric sulfate 25gm

Distilled water 1L

(B)Amonium chloride .5gm

Boil emersion A 15mins.
Boil emersion A+B 10 mins.
Boil part in cupric sulfate solution until red color well developed 
Remove to hot water while amonium chloride is added to the cupric solution then emerse 10 minutes. 
Rinse, dry, and finish. 

Edited by Zeb Camper
added process

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I seem to recall copper sulphate only being blue in the hydrated form. It is white when anhydrous. Is it stable on the surface of pure copper?

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It appears to be quite green and stable yes. 

Another method for the green is to fill an open container of amonia (dixie cup) and pour salt onto your copper and put another container over the copper and open amonia. the amonia in the air will react with the copper. 

20180210_172229.jpg

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Have any miracle grow around? Wet some clean copper down with plain water and randomly sprinkle that on. Makes for some odd coloration after 24 hours or so.

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23 minutes ago, Jonathan Silas said:

Have any miracle grow around? Wet some clean copper down with plain water and randomly sprinkle that on. Makes for some odd coloration after 24 hours or so.

Thanks! Which color might it be? 

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8 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

Thanks! Which color might it be? 

Funky blue green with red tones that show up sometimes but not others.. really unpredictable but pretty. I used to make wooden bird houses with copper roofs to sell at craft fairs and would do the roofs with this on about half of them.

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Cool. It looks almost like some kind of stone on the photos.

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Thanks, I gotta figure out how to make red and blue now. I want to bring some peices to life. Be it a beautiful rokusho on Japanese sword fittings, or giving a peice that ancient, weathered look, or more of a "magical" blue in the relief cuts of some runic ornament. lots of somewhat unexplored potential here. 

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Does Mr Sterling still come around here? He has a great book on carving Netsuke and I think he mentioned something about patina production in it ( read it YEARS ago and don't remember exactly) it's available as a pdf on line though (magic Google box Netsuke carving pdf) .

 

  Mr Ford Hallam would also be worth a Google from you, he does beautiful metal art using old fashioned tools and techniques. And polishes and patina are a big part of that.

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In one of the Men At Arms videos they got an amazing red finish on Copper by heating and quenching in a Borax solution.

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Thanks Gerhard! But, the problem with that is if you used any solder on the fittings it will melt. Also, I've heard it's inconsistent. 

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So, I saw something about egg patinas on ye ol' interwebs and thought I'd give it a try. Pretty much you boil an egg, chop it all up in an air tight container shell and all, and the copper will develop a reddish patina (oxide 1). Gave it a try, for a few hours it did darken some, but I wanted more. 

I threw the eggs, and copper in a pot filled with sugary brine and am currently boiling it now. I am getting a brown color right now, but here in a couple hours my hopes are that it may turn red. We shall see...

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Well, we will call that one inconclusive... I added some lemon juice wich pretty much took all the patina off. I should've known. I had reached a dark brown before that happened. before the brown it was a reddish purplish color. Perhaps I need to start with a thicker patina before I boil and use a more controlled amount of sugar. 

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 Right now I have you pictured in my mind as a cross between a tv chef and one of the Hags from Macbeth.... Double, double, toil and trouble.... ;)

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So, I Made my dad a copper bracelet after he broke his (supposed to help his joints). I just mashed some thick copper wire to shape and annealed it so he could bend it around his wrist. 

Any way, he left it on the bathroom sink for a long time. it has developed a dark brown/red patina. It is very redish on the edges, but my phone couldn't take a decent photo of it. 

I will try to boil it sometime soon to see if it enriches the red color. 

20180529_222127.jpg

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