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Forest Xavier

Triangular crossection rondel dagger

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I’ve been mulling around in my mind about making a rondel dagger with a triangular crossection (haven’t even dedicated pencil to paper yet so very early development).  I was thinking of making it 11ish inches (blade alone, not including tang), and a width at the base of the blade of about 1 inch, then a linear taper to the tip. The tip is going to be started at a point in the blade where the width is 1/4” and taper from there rapidly to the point at a 30° degree angle, hopefully giving a more reenforced tip.  Lastly I was thinking of doing a hollow grind on the blade for the first 2/3rds and leaving the last 1/3rd of the blade to the tip a flat grind, by doing this I was hoping to give a slightly better cutting/slashing edge on the lower part of the blade (as well as looking pretty cool, and yes I do realize that a rondel was a thrusting/stabbing weapon I’m not going for complete historical reproduction).  I was thinking that it would be made from 1095 and it’s going to be a stock removal blade.

 

Now with all that being said my immediate questions are this;

1) will 1095 work for this design? I understand it can become brittle at longer lengths, that combined with the relative thinness of the blade could just be a recipe for disaster.

2) during the heat treat I have the uncanny feeling that it has a very high probability of corkscrewing due to the hollow grind.

3) will the hollow grind take to much meat away from the blade making it flimsy

4) I’m worried if my tip would be reenforced enough to thrust into hard targets without breaking

 

off the top of my head those are my main questions or issues...can’t wait to hear back on ideas or comments...thanks guys

 

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How thick at the base?  Are you thinking equilateral triangle, or just flat back with a low ridge on one side?  That will make a big difference as far as how much hollow you can go.  And I wouldn't use 1095 for it regardless.  Something more forgiving like 5160 would be my choice.

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8 hours ago, Forest Xavier said:

2) during the heat treat I have the uncanny feeling that it has a very high probability of corkscrewing due to the hollow grind

Now that would be cool. Give it a twist.

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Alan..1” thick at the base (where the blade meets the cross guard) and equallateral triangle

Charles...I don’t know man it might look sweet but I’m not looking to make a steel pig tail lol

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Gotcha.  I'd say hollow it 'til you get sharp edges using a smallish wheel, like under 4" diameter.  I've seen a few originals done that way.  Well, they were probably scraped rather than wheel ground, but they were still hollow triangles.  As long as your grinds are even on all three faces and quench vertically point down warping should not be an issue.

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Hey Forest. Not a full corkscrew. I meant straight (looking at it end-on) but with a twist. Think putting the blade you described in a twisting jig.

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For point #4, I saw this one blade once, it was a hollow ground rhombic dagger. The maker knew that the tip would be too thin if he continued the hollow grind all the way through, so about a half inch from the tip he had the hollow grind gradually trail off into a full flat (or maybe convex, can't remember) so there would be plenty of meat at the tip. Maybe a similar technique would work for your blade??

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