Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 57
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I think that they were used for all sorts of specialty work and that much of the knowledge has been lost.  I also think that you should send me all of these so that I can do an extensive research proj

No, send me that first one.  I can put it to better use!    Otherwise I agree with Geoff. There were all sorts of specialty swages and mini-tools that fit in those slots.  Somewhere down in The W

Yup hoarding and rubbing hands, I have a few of these anvils . 

Posted Images

I cant remember where i found it. I think i have the site saved on my wifes phone. When she gets out of work i will check it out. The more and more i get into researching anvils and reading AIA i want to start collecting them and doing my own research on them and other anvils i find odd and interesting. There has been a lot of findings sense Postman wrote "the book" and now with the internet it makes it even easier with less traveling.  But the real fun im sure comes with actually seeing and touching these old relics. I would love to travel over seas and see all the anvils that never made it to the states especially the french anvils. I need to get my own copy of AIA and the book of mousehole forge. As of now my local library tracked down AIA and borrowed it from another library for me but i only have it till April 2nd so i am trying to read it before I have to return it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked through them. He has a couple french style anvils i am interested in. He reminds me of Steve Prillwitz at matchless antiques.  I am planning on visiting Steve in the coming weeks to see about a swage block.

Link to post
Share on other sites

00n0n_jyyryhg3D7w_600x450.jpg.a1cf4a0086c613b54c3efe660146722d.jpgstretch-back-1-768x398.jpg

There is some similarities between these. Maily the body and feet. This is south german 594 lbs. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/16/2018 at 5:16 PM, Geoff Keyes said:

Sarveranvil.jpg

Sarveranvil2.jpg

This is one of two anvils that Grant built

Geoff

Now that i am looking at this thing closer I never realized that the horn and the heal could be removed and replaced with other tooling. This thing has even more of my attention than it ever did before. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Today is the first time this picture showed up on my phone.

On 2/17/2018 at 8:13 AM, Jeremy Blohm said:

7118326671_294f39a313_b.jpg

What cause that hammer to get so depressed that it took that way out ?

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Vern Wimmer said:

What cause that hammer to get so depressed that it took that way out ?

Probably beating its head on an anvil its whole life. That would be my guess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 9 months later...

Hi, just picked up this beauty..  W Taylor 2-2-12 

The really nice thing about a cutlers anvil is the tooling is all dovetail and fairly short and super easy to make..  This also keeps nearly all the vibration and bounce that happens with shanked tools eliminated.. 

They are dovetail mounted so just take what ever material you want to use put in into the groove with a smaller wedge on one side and upset it into the dove tail..  

Finish forge the item, file the dove tail some to clean up, ,harden temper and wedge home with a smallish wedge.. 

Now you nearly have a tool that is locked to the anvil just like in a power hammer..  No moving around, no bouncing.. 

I've wanted on of these for awhile, so was happy to find this one only 1hr away..   This model is pretty great for any tooling I would want to use including spring swedges or fullering tools with a step up block..  It also has ample side faces for working over the edges.. 

The face on this one is nearly 3/4" thick..  It has several cutoff tools stuck in the other sq hole on the face and will remove these as some point..  





 

20190119_151431.jpg

20190119_152246.jpg

20190119_152319.jpg

20190119_163629.jpg

20190119_163644.jpg

Oh, one other thing..    This type of anvil was sunk into the stump vs just resting on top so is the reason there is no feet.. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 12:32 PM, Alan Longmire said:

https://www.blacksmithparadise.com/

Spend a few hours looking at this guy's stuff.  Even with shipping they're not outrageous.

Wow I just looked at that website. That's a dangerous site Alan. It could make me sell my right kidney for money for a 600lb anvil. I really want to get a huge stake anvil though. I don't know why I just want 1.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang Jen, great score! Those are rare enough in Europe, finding one in your area is even more amazing!

Its like they say about love, this one was meant to be your soulmate ;-)

And thanks for sharing, and also joining here. Lots of incredible talent and TRUE sharing of knowledge: peer recognized masters without inflated egos sharing information with each other.  I’m NOT one of them, but I do learn from them!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve O  II'm very excited with lots of coffee in me..  so rant on..

I've seen a few over the year in the whole of USA  so to find one so close was really quite funny..  About a year ago I said to myself if I found one in decent shape I'd buy it...    Well, shazam..  Now it's mine..    To true on your soul mate.. 

 Maybe one of the strangest things is every one talks about proper anvil size and many will down play having a robust mount and ample weight to the anvil itself.. 

I've been told on other forums,  I have big anvil envy as I'm always looking for an anvil that will meet the items I am looking for.. (Refflinghaus sounthern german is my ideal) 400+ lbs with only 5"+ face and a 1" hardie hole for my general purpose anvil.. (On the to buy list when I hit the lottery) and promote a solid heavy base with a large anvil bolted down so the base and anvil are tied together.. 

Anyhow,  all the cutler anvils I have seen in this style are 300lbs or over.. So when you think about it, the anvils size is huge compared to what most would think of as a proper sized anvil.. 

Most cutlery made was small compared to Wagon parts, or draft shoes, etc, etc..  so "Why" such a large anvil for items made from such small material..   It's a rhetorical question.. 

I"m pretty excited as it was a cutlers anvil or a Sawyers for knife and sword work, but now I've got a good piece that should be hard to beat.. 

Also take note that it has no feet... They were originally sunk into a hole not much bigger than the very bottom base.. The anvil is wider at the bottom, so once its sunk into the hole around it was sand and scale shoved in and as the anvil was in use it would get tighter in the hole.. Neat, neat, neat..  If you look at the pictures you can see how deep it was set.. 

Thanks for the welcome.. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/20/2019 at 11:31 AM, Jeremy Blohm said:

I'm truly jealous!!!!:o

did you ever find what you were looking for..  It looks like from this thread that you have a large interest in this style of anvil.. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, JenniferP said:

did you ever find what you were looking for..  It looks like from this thread that you have a large interest in this style of anvil.. 

 

On 3/17/2018 at 5:54 PM, Jeremy Blohm said:

00n0n_jyyryhg3D7w_600x450.jpg.a1cf4a0086c613b54c3efe660146722d.jpg

Yeah I ended up with this one. 200 lbs and it was made in germany. I haven't made any dies for it yet but this spring I will probably get around to it after I'm all healed up from my back surgery. I subscribed to you YouTube channel also. I hope to see a video about making dies for that beauty.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

 

Yeah I ended up with this one. 200 lbs and it was made in germany. I haven't made any dies for it yet but this spring I will probably get around to it after I'm all healed up from my back surgery. I subscribed to you YouTube channel also. I hope to see a video about making dies for that beauty.

Nice..  Wasn't sure from all the different pictures which you had gotten...   Imported? 


I had back surgery 9 year ago..  L4, L5 left side was trashed..   Still have partial numbness in the left  hip, butt and leg but it doesn't slow me down..   Full time farrier 31 years..  Biggest thing for me is I have to stretch and keep it moving..  snow shoeing is about the best, and this is going to sound funny. But heeled shoes for some reason does it also.. :) 

I will consider making a video on tooling but it will be hard till i have shop up.. The demo trailer is where all the work is done now so not much room... I'll give it a thought though.. 

Thanks for subscribing..  It makes a world of difference with the Youtube algorithms.. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I found it in New Hampshire. It was. LONG ride from Michigan but well worth it.

I had an L5 discectomy when I was 17 years old and now I'm 32 and had an L5S1 fusion. I have a good friend that swears by wearing cowboy boots and it helps with his back. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

just a few comments....

 Most of the sheffield cutlers anvils are mounted onto (or into) large stone blocks, traditionaly using rotted horse manure to tamp them in.

 I have a few cutlers anvils  with the tooling slots.  ( or toolmakers anvils)and they range in weight from around 150 to 700 lb. Most of these were designed for large scale manufacturing ...so repetativly making the same product 1000"s of times.

 I have tooled up one of mine and it works just fine...

sure many of you have seen it...ive watched it many times a lot to learn from this guy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpeyhC-UIFg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a bit confused with this one. I'm assuming the horn was cut off and a dovetail milled in. I just cant see the reason for it.

image (12).jpg

Screenshot_20190131-154859_Chrome.jpg

Screenshot_20190131-155428_Chrome.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes you just have to think whoever did it had a cunning plan in mind that we, alas, may never know.  May have been brilliant, may have been absolutely nuts.  Looks like your anvil otherwise.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...