Jump to content

Recommended Posts

And Owen, thanks for reposting that film.  We all should watch it regularly.  Mr. Craven had more skill than I know what to do with... Absolutely LOVE the nail nick hardy.  The man forged folder blades the modern books say you can't do without surface grinders and milling machines.  Inspirational stuff.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 57
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I think that they were used for all sorts of specialty work and that much of the knowledge has been lost.  I also think that you should send me all of these so that I can do an extensive research proj

No, send me that first one.  I can put it to better use!    Otherwise I agree with Geoff. There were all sorts of specialty swages and mini-tools that fit in those slots.  Somewhere down in The W

Yup hoarding and rubbing hands, I have a few of these anvils . 

Posted Images

On 1/26/2019 at 3:07 AM, owen bush said:

just a few comments....

 Most of the sheffield cutlers anvils are mounted onto (or into) large stone blocks, traditionaly using rotted horse manure to tamp them in.

 I have a few cutlers anvils  with the tooling slots.  ( or toolmakers anvils)and they range in weight from around 150 to 700 lb. Most of these were designed for large scale manufacturing ...so repetativly making the same product 1000"s of times.

 I have tooled up one of mine and it works just fine...

sure many of you have seen it...ive watched it many times a lot to learn from this guy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpeyhC-UIFg

Well don't hold on the pictures..   all the ones I had seen previously were in the 400 and up.. 

The guy had this one advertised as 600lbs but knew it wasn' t 600lbs when I saw it..     This one was a little different as it had the horn and heel with large hardie hole..  I contacted the guy again to see if he knew any history.. Never heard back.. 

By the way Owen,    I knew about the way they are mounted..   Its 'really pretty amazng..  The body of the anvil is tapered so once it's sat into the hole anything that falls into the margins just locks it in even more.. 

Edited by JenniferP
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2019 at 2:52 PM, Alan Longmire said:

And Owen, thanks for reposting that film.  We all should watch it regularly.  Mr. Craven had more skill than I know what to do with... Absolutely LOVE the nail nick hardy.  The man forged folder blades the modern books say you can't do without surface grinders and milling machines.  Inspirational stuff.

I hadn't seen that until now.... You know I used to think I was somewhat proficient at hammer work... He gets that done 10x faster and 10x better than I did.

Now I really want to try finding a cutlers anvil and setting it up with custom tooling!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a good short showing one of that pattern of anvil in use for sword blades.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, JenniferP said:

Well don't hold on the pictures..   all the ones I had seen previously were in the 400 and up.. 

The guy had this one advertised as 600lbs but knew it wasn' t 600lbs when I saw it..     This one was a little different as it had the horn and heel with large hardie hole..  I contacted the guy again to see if he knew any history.. Never heard back.. 

By the way Owen,    I knew about the way they are mounted..   Its 'really pretty amazng..  The body of the anvil is tapered so once it's sat into the hole anything that falls into the margins just locks it in even more.. 

Ill dig some out, I must have 8 or ten of these anvils now.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2019 at 10:50 PM, Jerrod Miller said:

Interchangeable horns, duh!  

It sure does look that way!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 1 year later...

Hey All, I joined the forum to speak and learn about these types of Anvil. I use a nice one I got from Matchless awhile ago. It's a four hundred plus pounder. Had some issues with top plate separation which I repaired with a mechanical solution using a section of T-slot rail. I have made a slew of tooling for the various slots and partial holes. There are historical pictures coming to light, thanks to the internet, even so, most of the mystery of the various holes still remain to be definitively, demonstrably solved. I have that great French book and thanks to google translate am looking for clues to this and also the Church Windows another of my fave topics. Anyway, Hi all! Safety Glasses!.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...