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New Knife: 80CrV2, Cherry, Rosewood


Eric Dennis
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Hello,

I just finished this commission. The steel is 80CrV2. Scales are black cherry with brass pins, and the saya is rosewood. Thickest part of the spine is 3/16" with distal taper is both directions. Some parts i'm not too thrilled about, some parts I am pretty thrilled about. Still working on getting a clean plunge-line, which is always hard for me.

Total Length: 9.5"

Blade Length: 4"

Thanks for peeking,

 

Adam Knife BSF1.jpg

Adam Knife BSF 2.jpg

 

Edited by Eric Dennis
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I like it a lot!

Plunge lines can be tricky, one thing I do is ground the bevels, and then take a chainsaw file and carefully file the plunge line in. then, go to hand sanding on a hard steel backer with a bit of a radius on the edge. I use a piece of 3x3 angle iron clamped in a vise.

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That is amazing. I love the blade. Quick question I was researching today. What did you use for the quench? When I looked this alloy up in the heat treat guide, it indicated it is 1080+. I have seen stock available and was thinking about trying it. From your project, did you find a specific quench for it or is my understanding correct that you follow 1080 quench for the 80Crv2?

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"1080+" was a product designation at one time for an almost identical steel to 80CrV2 sold today. The good news is that you can use the heat treat, hardening, tempering methods for 1080. The better news is that the vanadium in 80CrV2 gives a margin of error if you go over heat a bit in the quench portion. The Chromium adds noticable toughness.

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Thanks Vern! That helps a lot. I was confused when I looked for 1080 on the Alpha website and I gleaned the initial point that they were related, but your additional detail is extremely helpful. I wanted to try 1084 or 1080 for my next projects. I have used 1095, but in my reading it sounded like going to one of those would be best for newcomers. Your additional detail makes it more clear as to why (margin of error where I don’t have a pyrometer, etc).

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I treated  it more or less like i do  1084. Quenched in veggie oil that I warmed up.  I ended up getting a really thick layer of decarb with super tough steel beneath, which  other people seem to get with 80CrV2 also. 

This steel is really forgiving in the forging (I find) and  moves  under the  hammer relatively easy.  The heat treat seems pretty  forgiving as well. And the  result is a really nice balance  of toughness and  hardness. Once normalized or annealed it drills easily. Right now it's my go to steel for most knives and woodworking tools  as well like adzes and chisels.

Here is a thread specifically about the steel: 

 

Edited by Eric Dennis
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