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Kreg Whitehead

Lets see your makers mark....and a Q

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I think I mentioned I have ALOT of free/spare time at work. Long story short had some guy on fb tell me that you need to sand to 200 before HT or the scratches could be areas that could fail during HT.

I stopped going past 36....because its gonna go right back to the 36 after HT until I get my edge close. Is that legit as far as the scratches being an issue...or potential issue.

And it scratches are bad....does that mean my makers mark is gonna be a potential area to fail?

I havent ordered it yet.....was thinking a stamp vs etching

I have been doodling this for years....dont ask me why. My initials are KW

makersmark.jpg

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36 is much more coarse than I would go as a last before heat treat.

If you get, say, up to 400 before HT you will find it easier on your belts. It is much more efficient to put a good finish on softer, pre HT, steel than hardened steel. As a bonus if you use a product like ATP on the blade between the 400 and HT then after the HT you can go right back to the 400 and then on to your desired finish level.

I do know of one big maker that had a problem with tang stamps causing weakening years ago. The electric stencil etching process has eliminated such concerns for most folks. Check "erniesknives.com"

Also do a google search of the forum for "logo etching"

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Thanks.....I have been trying to just do a primary bevel and no secondary. I leave the grinder at the same angle I ground the blade at and shoot for somewhere in the 020 to 030 range at the tip before HT.

I could take it to 400 before HT.....but its going back to 36 after HT to grind my edge.....or should I say to get it close enough the drop to a finer grit.

I will check into the electro deal. I have a hunch its mo money than the stamp =/

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I don't think I've ever gone below 120 on the actual edge. 

Using something like ATP 641 ($20 for enough to do dozens of blades) if you finished to about 400grit before HT you wouldn't need to drop back for polishing below 400. For the cutting edge use as fine a belt as you have the patience for.

The etching template I got from Ernie was less than $70. That includes 2 different sizes and enough stencils of both to last a good long time. I did find the specific power supply he suggests on Fleabay for $120 but you can improvise with many different power sources cheap or you might, probably, have one around. Some simple dc power converters for household electronics will work.

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I don't have a makers mark yet.. Ive been trying to come up with a design for days.

 

I also can't think of a name for my Forge..

Edited by Conner Michaux

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1 hour ago, Vern Wimmer said:

I don't think I've ever gone below 120 on the actual edge. 

Using something like ATP 641 ($20 for enough to do dozens of blades) if you finished to about 400grit before HT you wouldn't need to drop back for polishing below 400. For the cutting edge use as fine a belt as you have the patience for.

The etching template I got from Ernie was less than $70. That includes 2 different sizes and enough stencils of both to last a good long time. I did find the specific power supply he suggests on Fleabay for $120 but you can improvise with many different power sources cheap or you might, probably, have one around. Some simple dc power converters for household electronics will work.

I am not sure if it all in my head but it sure seems the 36 on the hardened blade makes less heat  Maybe its just the fact that by the time I go to 2 and 400 the edge is just that much thinner.

If I were doing a secondary bevel I could see where taking the blade to 400 first would be helpful.

The stamp is closer to 100.00   I really cant see how it could hurt anything.  Guess it will only cost 100 buck to find out. lol

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My wife has a cricut (vinyl stencil cutter) that we used to make the stencil for this mark. Etched it with an automotive trickle charger, salt water, and q-tips. If you try this way, swap swabs often to avoid blotchiness.

laserdolphins-1522790722236.jpg

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22 minutes ago, Jon Cook said:

My wife has a cricut (vinyl stencil cutter) that we used to make the stencil for this mark. Etched it with an automotive trickle charger, salt water, and q-tips. If you try this way, swap swabs often to avoid blotchiness.

laserdolphins-1522790722236.jpg

Thats kewl....if an automotive charger can be used that would appear to make that method cheaper than my stamp. I will look into it thanks guys.

Edit....dumb question can the stencils be reused. Anyone on here that I can hire to make my stencil?

Edited by Kreg

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Before hardening I dont really care about the finish of my blades as long as there isnt deep galling from files or really really deep scratches, I try to harden blades with an edge thinner than a dime and they havent been cracking in oil. They are usually file finished and usually not a fine finish. I do knock the corners of the blade edge down with a file, usually I round it out, I also get my profile and tapers set up with files so the blade is at its final dimensions aside from the sharpening. 

After hardening there is still plenty of stock reduction to do, lower grit belts work faster and produce less heat than higher grit belts So you get less overheated edges.

I have hardened a few miniatures with the edge basically sharp and it made sense to me that the finish should be better before hardening but a fine file finish was fine.

 

If you can harden an edge at its finished thickness then do it with a nice finish, but the thicker the spine of the blade the more force there is pulling on the edge during hardening so it works with a really thin G.I.Joe sized blade but I wouldnt try it on a 3/8" thick chopper. 

I mostly do full height flat grinds with a microbevel and I quench in canola. how you prepare for hardening depends on blade thickness, quenchant, and grind type.

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1 hour ago, Vern Wimmer said:

I don't think I've ever gone below 120 on the actual edge. 

Using something like ATP 641 ($20 for enough to do dozens of blades) if you finished to about 400grit before HT you wouldn't need to drop back for polishing below 400. For the cutting edge use as fine a belt as you have the patience for.

The etching template I got from Ernie was less than $70. That includes 2 different sizes and enough stencils of both to last a good long time. I did find the specific power supply he suggests on Fleabay for $120 but you can improvise with many different power sources cheap or you might, probably, have one around. Some simple dc power converters for household electronics will work.

Do you have Ernie's contact info...think I would like to pull the trigger here. Thanks again everyone :D

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I made a hot punch with my initials on it by making a few smaller punches. A triangle shaped punch for the Z and a D shaped punch for the inside of the C. Then I needle filed between the 2 letters. I need to make a new smaller one. 

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5 minutes ago, Kreg said:

Thats kewl....if an automotive charger can be used that would appear to make that method cheaper than my stamp. I will look into it thanks guys.

Edit....dumb question can the stencils be reused. Anyone on here that I can hire to make my stencil?

Automotive charger, dc converter from a radio, musical keyboard or such about anything that can run on batteries but also has a plug in converter. As I mentioned I got Ernie's suggested power supply but that was really a "splurge" for myself. I just felt like I wanted a dedicated setup. 

A properly made and used stencil can do a lot of blades. Ernie inclues several of both sizes so I have nothing to worry about for a long time.

Check the website I gave earlier. There is someone else who is highly reccommended, I don't recall the name, but Ernie was the first on my list when I was shopping and everything went very smoothly.

I like it because putting the logo on is the last step and acts as a QC stamp.

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Blue lightning custom stencils

Www.erniesknives.com

Email:sharpknife@aol.com

1-407-568-5438

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I bought the Etch-o-matic (no kidding) and I buy my stencils from Marking methods. 

http://www.etch-o-matic.com/price_sheets/etch_kits.php

https://www.markingmethods.com/store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=73&idcategory=0

The electro-etching process relies on really good stencils. Poor quality stencils lead to bleed through and shallow etching.

Oh and BTW, I grind to 120/150 before HT and start again at 60 afterward. Rough grind pre-HT the edge is about as thick as a nickel. Single bevel.

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You can see the maker's mark registry for this forum here.

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I heat treat at 36 or sometimes 24 grit . I see the course grits as material removal grits everything else ids for cleaning their scratches up...

I do a lot of grinding post HT so it makes no sense to grind fine and then go back...

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Thanks all. I need to buy a scribe and some layout fluid. Most of the edge is about as thick as a dime....could only find a penny this morning.

Thunk I was gonna have to toss it on the file jig....but at the end of the day the tip is gonna have to be freehanded after HT.

Gonna go for a single edge about 15* inclusive that will hopefully be razor sharp and handle the chop test.

 

bedge.jpg

bright.jpg

bleft.jpg

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