Jump to content

Rare artifact of the kingdom of Norssex, via Gallifrey


Alan Longmire
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have no idea how I managed to miss this thread until today. What an inspiring project Sir Alan. You are as gifted for the story as you are for the blade.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fantastic! Thanks for adding in the bits about how you did the pseudo-garnet work. I never would have thought to use different temp solder in the work flow like that, genius! 

  • Like 1

Not all those who wander are lost. -J.R.R. Tolkien

-Shards of the Dark Age- my blog
-Nine Worlds Workshop-
-Last Apocalypse Forge-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice fusion between the styles, unmistakably Saxon, unmistakably Scottish.

How does the nugold tarnish?  I've been considering using some.

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome, Alan! Love the pommel with the faux garnet inlay.

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And still more thanks!

George, the Nu-gold tarnishes much like brass, but stays a bit tinny-looking, if that makes sense.  I pickle it in a mix of hot hydrogen peroxide, vinegar, and citric acid (aka paracetic acid), which is better for brass than Sparex or pH-down.  It comes out bright pink, because the acid attacks the zinc long before it touches the copper.  A little scratch-brushing with a wire wheel on a dremel or Foredom flex shaft and it looks very much like 14 karat gold.  After a month or two in the shop atmosphere of coal smoke and pipe tobacco smoke, it darkens a bit, but not much.  Flitz seems to keep further tarnish at bay indefinitely.  Or a month at least, that's as long as this has been in the world.  That said, I do have a couple of plaques I made in 2015 that are barely dulled, and look more like 10k gold.  No green fuzz yet!

Two fun facts about paracetic acid, or straight citric acid for that matter: It turns bright blue-green when exhausted, and with a fresh batch you can take a copper-plated zinc penny and remove the zinc core in a week or so, leaving behind only a thin shell of copper that still looks like a penny, but is nearly weightless. It's also relatively nontoxic and doesn't stink.  The downside is it degrades rapidly with exposure to air and light, so you have to mix up a fresh batch every few days.  But it's cheap.  3% hydrogen peroxide mixed half and half with Heinz cleaning vinegar (distilled white vinegar at 6% acidity).  Warm it up and dissolve dry citric acid crystals, available in the pickling supply section of the grocery store, until it's saturated. When it seems to quit working, a fresh shot of H2O2 and citric acid revives it for a few hours.  When it's a beautiful clear aquamarine color it's past refreshing. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Et merci beaucoup, Joel!

John, the descending flow temperatures of solder are of great use in jewelry-type work.  If you don't already have a copy, I highly recommend "The Complete Metalsmith" by Tim McCreight.  It is geared towards jewelers, but has tons of useful tips and tricks that are of great assistance in bladesmithing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan,

Creative and really striking. I like it a lot! The pommel is cool. Not your fault you have too much style for just one timeline.

Glad I stopped in to see this.

 

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love it!  I'm a big fan of could-have-been creations like this.  You did a great job of evolving the anglo saxon style toward scottish dirks.  I also really like the way you did the garnets - it's the original technique just with different materials - I don't think you can't get any closer to real for this side of a king's ransom.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tell the doctor that the pommel looks very much like a Sonnenrad  or black sun symbol. Perhaps it also has continental influence or the maker is/was aware of such symbols from previous work pieces. ;) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan this is really a stellar work! One of these days I will have to visit so you can show me how you do this! I'm a big fan! Man the lines are just perfect but I think maybe my favorite touch is the pieces on the sheath! they just hit the right spot for me!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...