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t cudworth

rebar 01 sandwich

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Ill be having some free time this weekend and will be starting a san mai project. Ive only done 1 before, but not with these steels.  I have a new slab of 01, and some classic rebar. Just looking for some insight as to if anyone has tried this, if these two are cranky together, or any tips at all. Thanks in advance everyone!

Tom

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I would be a little concerned that rebar, being such an uncontrolled mix, may have some elements in it that will make the welding difficult.  It might be fun to try, but it is probably a little on the risky side.

Some of the folks with more metallurgical knowledge will probably chime in shortly.

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The only other things Ive got laying around are railroad spikes, horseshoes and lots and lots of leafspring. If any of those are a better fit, I would go that direction too.

Tom

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If you feel like using rebar, use it. Just know that it is a less than optimal steel for anything, like Brian said, usually lots of impurities. 

Why not just order some 15N20 and use that? At least then, you know what youre working with (plus the O1/15N20 contrast is superb.)

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Try finding some wrought iron. It makes some really nice san-mai.

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My first reaction was to ask "Why on earth would you sandwich a perfectly good piece of O-1 between two pieces of rebar?"

My second reaction was "Why not?"

I second Gerald's suggestion. Let us know how that turns out.

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I guess another thing to consider is that the rebar will suck a lot of the carbon out of the O-1.  You might end up with something less than 0.5% carbon in the end if you have equal amounts of each steel.

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When they make rebar everything including the Volkswagen goes in the mix! Take a look at this thread! https://sizes.com/materials/rebar.htm

Here is another interesting read on rebar! http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/power-tools/12-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-rebar_o

An interesting bit. 

In 2000, over 70 million tons of steel — including car bodies, appliances, and reinforcing steel bars — were melted down and recycled into new products. Of that amount, more than 7 million tons of steel was made into new reinforcing steel.

Made completely of steel, most rebar used in new construction came from recycled materials, and after a teardown, most of it will be recycled again. According to the Steel Recycling Institute, rebar ranks as the nation’s most commonly recycled material.

Apr 21, 2011 · What rebar steel made of? ... Mostly made of recycled scrap. Could be of anything the scrapper hauled in, from old cars, to barbed wire.

Still want to use rebar??

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To be fair though, guess what they melted down to make the nice 1080, 1095, etc. that we all like?  Pretty much the same things.  They just have tighter controls on the chemistry range and will make more drastic chemistry corrections to get the final product in spec.  The only real difference is the higher spec stuff tends to have more careful sorting to keep some things out of the mix (like lead and tin, among others) to begin with.  

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Thanks everyone for the info. I ended up not having any time this weekend, had to spend all weekend at work. I am gonna skip the rebar, doesnt sound like its worth it. Would the railroad spikes be better? Carbon content wise?

Tom

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Rr spikes would probably be a more consistent material to work with, but still not a very high C content. But you could just weld a high C bit into it to act as the cutting edge and still have a perfectly functional knife. 

Allow me to reiterate my previous point about using 15N20.  

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O1 does not need many excuses to split down the core when sandwiched in a 'san mai' construction! Normaise lots before heat treatment, and don't overheat before quench.

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