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John Myshkoff

Just completed another puukko.

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180 to 220x hand sanding to remove scratches.  Still quite a bit to go for that 800x satin finish.  When the blade is finished, I will fit the front bolster and shorten the tang.  The front bolster will be .188" and have a peened surface. 

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Edited by John Myshkoff

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Thanks John, I'm patient.

BTW, It saddens me to say that the Chicago was decommissioned and salvaged by one of our crews as well as the 32nd st. San Diego

base crew before it was taken out to the target range off the California coast.

The Ajax was de commed and scuttled to be an artificial reef in 85 I believe.

 

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Fancy that, we were writing posts at the same time !..

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For a moment I didn't know what was going on.  So many changes to San Diego I don't think I would recognize the place.  I remember the Boxer a WW2 CV purchased by N.E.L. still in WW2 condition with the mothball areas cocooned.  I also remember seeing the Newport News and the Midway or Coral Sea being cut up for scrap at Camden Yards in Baltimore.  My wife and I were going to Virginia both times.  The News was one of about 5 or 6 ships pounding the VC with 5" 6" and 8" gunfire.  What a sight that was.  I'm glad I was in the Navy and was able to serve with some great chiefs who taught me a lot and urged me to make rate.  We also had a warrant officer, Gunner Ray Barrows who made it a point to come to everyone's promotion ceremony. All of us would follow him into hell and back; he was a real leader.  Martin Marlin seaplane patrol aircraft used the entire harbor to takeoff and Neptunes P-2 were always in the air.  So were the Douglas AD1 Skyraiders  although by 67 or 68 they were out of the fleet.  I always ate that stuff up...still do.  Now that I'm retired I make knives among other things outdoors.

Edited by John Myshkoff

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I left Diego in 81 and didn't look back, liked the navy, hated San Diego.

I didnt see any action myself but the Philippines were considered a hot zone due to the communist uprising in 80

when we were there but it wasnt much to worry over, spent 4 months anchored in Diego Garcia. (Fantasy Island)

as our primary station on West Pac. Did a LOT of repair work on other ships there.

like you now days I like to hunt and fish and make knives and play with other projects in my little machine shop/forge/foundry/ escape from the missus cave....;)

as well as deal with a good sized garden we eat good on all winter...............

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Brass Bolsters cut from .25" and .375" brass bars.  Oversize template used to pencil in outline and a scribe used to cut in outline.  The r/s bolster is .25" and can now be drilled in the center to start inletting the 107mm blade.  I use needle files.

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Top blade is  95 mm taken to 800x satin finish.  The bottom blade is a 107mm taken to 800x finish.  This is the blade which will be used for this WIP.  Please remember fellow bladesmiths I am not a professional, so any advice or shop tips are most welcome.  My knives now take me about 12-18 hours down from 30 or so.

44375071802_a009ee4dc1_n.jpg 

Since this is a holiday weekend, I may not have a chance to do anymore knife work.  So my friends, be patient and stay tuned.

Edited by John Myshkoff

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Thanks for taking the time to do this, No complaints from me. It takes me forever to make knives, To many things going on and not enough time in the shop. I just love puukkos for some reason.

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Speed is not a factor, it's a hobby, to me anyways, and thanks for

sharing your methods, it's greatly appreciated..............................................B)

Edited by Clifford Brewer

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Metal work takes up the most time during the process.  Blade fit and finish takes time and very relaxing for me, but no matter I'm not in a speed contest.  I do my work in natural light, it is easier on my aging eyes.  The plan for today is to rough out the bolster shape on the 2x72 grinder and clean the mess in the garage.

Hello to lars in Denmark and Doug here in the U.S.  Doug Lester, were you also in the navy? 

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   The plan for today is to start inletting the blade to the bolster.  The outline of the bolster was scribed and centerline marked.  Next I drilled a .156"  hole in the center of the bolster.  This is the start for putting the tapered tang through the bolster.  Always drill a smaller hole than the tang...you can file it bigger, but not smaller. Guess how I learned that. I give myself plenty of material to work with to allow for mistakes and for a good tight fit.  Needle files are needed for this process.

Notice the scribe.  I use it to outline the tang and blade up to the shoulder.  I remove the miniscule amount of material up to the line.  Eventually the blade fits very tightly into the bolster.  I do not hammer the bolster onto the blade.  Yes, my method is slower, but it works for me.  Once I am to this point, inletting is easier.  I push the blade by hand.

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Edited by John Myshkoff
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Blade is now inletted into the brass.  More would have been done, but today was my volunteer day at my local parish.  Brass is polished to satin 1000x.  You can see the roughed outline of the bolster shape.

 42670395330_2725f3a658.jpg

Blade in brass.  The next step: grind the shape and do the peened finish.  Peening will tighten the fit of the blade to bolster even more.  So you may need to slightly refit. I will trim rear bolster from .375 brass and scallop out  the sides.  On this knife the design of the rear bolster will be a little different than the last puukko below. 

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Edited by John Myshkoff
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Front bolster rough trimmed out and peened.  Blade fit is very tight.  The second photo shows the rear bolster being shaped for the newest Tommi puukko.  It is about 50% complete.

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Be certain to mark the centerlines of all sides of your handle block.  This will help you align the hole for the tang when you drill and keep the blade and bolsters aligned.

  44495718911_9ee77d93d0.jpg

 

Edited by John Myshkoff
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Excellent photos of a perfect fit-up.  Thanks! B)

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Thanks Alan and to everyone who is following this thread.  The Finnish puukkoseppa  use their traditional methods of assembly which may be viewed and studied on the nordiska knivar website.  The Finns drill through the rear bolster and peen the tang for an incredibly tight fit.  I do not use this method.  I drill the channel which is just big enough for the tang. Then I epoxy the tang.  My rear bolster has a small brass wood screw sweated on.  Then I screw it in place and use a small amount of epoxy for a perfect seal.  This is my method of assembly prior to shaping the handle.  The professional bladesmiths out there are probably reaching for the Ibuprofen.  One of my puukkos was dropped by a buddy.  It hit the floor butt first with no damage.  

Butt cap is now shaped.  Final finish when handle is completely shaped.

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Edited by John Myshkoff

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very clean work on all of these. I am a big fan of puukkos.

you render them very well!

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On 9/3/2018 at 12:01 PM, John Myshkoff said:

...Notice the scribe.  I use it to outline the tang and blade up to the shoulder.  I remove the miniscule amount of material up to the line.  Eventually the blade fits very tightly into the bolster.  I do not hammer the bolster onto the blade.  Yes, my method is slower, but it works for me.  Once I am to this point, inletting is easier.  I push the blade by hand.

This quote tells me everything I Need to know about you, and explains why your work is always so crisp :)

 

Nicely done WIP, and very helpful.  I use a scribe for inletting in a lot of different ways, but had never considered they way you progressively mark around the tang.  I'll have to try that one!

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Hey Brian, Thank you for your comments.

 I noticed a bit of missing info.  I should have mentioned I push the brass bolster into place on the blade once I get the blade inletting started.  

Edited by John Myshkoff

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The butt cap is screwed in place.  I will countersink for the screw head then epoxy.

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Edited by John Myshkoff
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Puukko ..... and I get interested. The hardest part is fitting the guard to the rhomboid blade and you’ve nailed it more than once. So whatever your doing, do it often as you are. 

The grind can get real trick especially if the blade is tapered to the tip and angled narrower in width at the tip. Very hard almost impossible not to have the bevel grind not extend past the blade midline as the get to the tip. Jonas Kallioniemi has this part perfect so I’ve tried to copy his work... with my humbling experience. .

super nice and keep posting. Really enjoy your work. Thanks !, 

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The tang channel was drilled in Wednesday's post.   I shortened the tang today and added  shallow notches for additional bonding with the epoxy.  I  am holding the assembly so you can see the butt cap in place and the angle of the blade grinds lined up with the centerline on my wood block.  Next step will be to epoxy the blade into the wood.  The butt cap and bolster are oversize  and will be trimmed to final dimensions when the handle is shaped.

44539275281_5d934ed5b4.jpg 

 

Edited by John Myshkoff

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Greay WIP John, Thank you for the share  !!!!..................B)

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The blade and butt cap are epoxied and ready to start trimming the handle outline.  I use the TLAFAR principle for this part.  That Looks And Feels About Right.

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Edited by John Myshkoff

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