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Aiden CC

Grinding Wheels on Grizzly Sander?

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Something I've been thinking about for a while, based on the fact that historically blades have been ground on stone wheels and that one of the largest knife making expenses are sanding belts, is the use of hard grinding wheels for some knife grinding. I've been looking at wheels, and it seems like my Grizzly runs at a safe RPM to run 8-10" wheels (in fact, a little on the slow side). The buffing arbor has a 5/8" threaded section, and it would be possible to find a bushing to step down from the typical 1" hole size, however the length of the arbor might be too much of a cantilever for any serious pressure at high RMP. I believe the contact wheels have a 7/8" hole in them, so would still need a bushing, but would have less cantilever. 

Basically, I'm wondering if anyone has tried something like this/if it would even be work investigating. Something else I'm considering is making a bar to apply pressure to a blade on the regular contact wheel like in this video around 3:50 

The ideal would be to grind on the underside of the wheel so it's turning away from the edge and has the most ergonomic angle without changing the way the sander is set up. Would love to hear the thoughts of people on this and on the use of hard wheels in general.

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Hmm, err, if not for a fatality within my company due to a hard grinding wheel accident. I might say OK, but since that time, I have looked at all my grinding wheels as potential death devices and have limited their use to almost never.  I either forge to finish or use a sander, or just file to finish. 

If the equipment is not made for it, it's probably not a good idea in the first place. I may not have your idea totally visualized but I get an image of either a wheel exploding or it grabbing and throwing something at you. Is it worth the risk? 

 

 

Edited by Daniel W

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Also, stones are not as efficient in terms of rate of removal.  If you value your time at all, you are likely to save money with belts.  

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2 hours ago, Daniel W said:

Hmm, err, if not for a fatality within my company due to a hard grinding wheel accident. I might say OK, but since that time, I have looked at all my grinding wheels as potential death devices and have limited their use to almost never.  I either forge to finish or use a sander, or just file to finish. 

If the equipment is not made for it, it's probably not a good idea in the first place. I may not have your idea totally visualized but I get an image of either a wheel exploding or it grabbing and throwing something at you. Is it worth the risk? 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Also, stones are not as efficient in terms of rate of removal.  If you value your time at all, you are likely to save money with belts.  

Yeah, thought more about it, and stones don't seem like the way to go. Also, I put a larger contact wheel on my sander and rotated the platen/idle wheel mechanism so that the wheel is rotating "up" and was pleasantly surprised with how fast the stock removal is. I'll put pictures up at some point. Basically, the sparks go away from you and its easy to apply good pressure without putting as much load on the motor.

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