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A couple of knives for an exhibition.


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Hi All

It has been a while, here are a couple of pieces I made for an exhibition.

1) Deer antler, Gilding metal (tombac) and damascus,  total length 28 cm.blade 16 cm

2) Cow horn, Gilding metal, damascus, total length 35 cm, blade 22 cm.

P1130112.JPG

P1130157.JPG

P1130121.JPG

P1130135.JPG

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You know I love your stuff, Richard!  Especially on these because you used the term "tombac" and defined it correctly. :lol:  I run into tombac buttons on historic archaeological sites quite frequently, and some people don't understand why I don't call them "brass."   

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Very nice indeed .........still remember visiting your shop back in 2006 .....I was travelling NZ  for 6 weeks with my family and we suddenly saw a sign with a knife on it .....decided to follow the sign and ended up at your shop ....did not forge my knives at that time so it was a whole new thing to me. Cannot remember if it was Dunedin .....? 

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On 5/24/2018 at 9:50 AM, Alan Longmire said:

You know I love your stuff, Richard!  Especially on these because you used the term "tombac" and defined it correctly. :lol:  I run into tombac buttons on historic archaeological sites quite frequently, and some people don't understand why I don't call them "brass."   

To be fair, Tombac is a type of brass (an alpha brass, meaning one with >65% Cu and <35% Zn), so technically you could/should call them brass.  

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50 minutes ago, Jerrod Miller said:

To be fair, Tombac is a type of brass (an alpha brass, meaning one with >65% Cu and <35% Zn), so technically you could/should call them brass.  

OTOH, isn't brass a form of Tombac ? :P

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13 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

To be fair, Tombac is a type of brass (an alpha brass, meaning one with >65% Cu and <35% Zn), so technically you could/should call them brass.  

The suff I used is reddish in colour here are some figures to show it is different than brass.

  • "Gilting tombac":
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead 1.5%, tin 3%
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead 3%, tin 1%
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead, tin 0.2%
  • "French tombac for sword handles", pommels and fittings: copper 80%, zinc 17%, 3% tin
  • "Yellow tombac of Paris" for gilt ornaments: copper 85%, zinc 15%, trace% tin
  • "Hanover tombac": copper 85.3%, zinc 14.7%
  • Chrysochalk: copper 86%, zinc 14%
  • "Red tombac of Paris": copper 90%, zinc 7.9%, 1.5% lead
  • "Red tombac of Vienna": copper 97.8%, zinc 2.2%
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13 hours ago, Raymond Richard said:

I've never seen a deer antler crown as straight as the one you used. Was the deer a Sambar Stag?

Both knives looks exceptional!

Thank you Raymond, sorry I have no idea what deer it was but I don't think it was Sambar it could possibly be from a farmed deer they breed a lot of them here and experiment with cross breeding

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18 hours ago, larsjacobsen said:

Very nice indeed .........still remember visiting your shop back in 2006 .....I was travelling NZ  for 6 weeks with my family and we suddenly saw a sign with a knife on it .....decided to follow the sign and ended up at your shop ....did not forge my knives at that time so it was a whole new thing to me. Cannot remember if it was Dunedin .....? 

Yes you are right Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, I have moved since though 800km north to Motueka area near Nelson and have a bigger workshop.

 

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Richard, I always find your work, inspiring and outstanding. These two definitely are fantastic and they do not disappoint me in any way! They make me say I need to step up my game even to get close to that!! 

Bowing to the master.jpg

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11 hours ago, Richard van Dijk said:

some figures to show it is different than brass.

Those are types of brass.  It is like claiming that 15N20 isn't steel because it has more than just Fe and C.  There is nothing wrong with being more specific and using the term Tombac rather than simply calling it brass (I think it is far better to do so).  It should just be noted that it is indeed brass.  

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On 5/27/2018 at 7:14 AM, Jerrod Miller said:

Those are types of brass.  It is like claiming that 15N20 isn't steel because it has more than just Fe and C.  There is nothing wrong with being more specific and using the term Tombac rather than simply calling it brass (I think it is far better to do so).  It should just be noted that it is indeed brass.  

Very well Jerrod, whatever makes you happy, but to me and some others it is Gilding metal or Tombac.

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You say Tomado and I say Tomahto, you say what you want and I say what I want...…...what I want to say is whatever that stuff is, those knives are smokin! I always love seeing your stuff Richard, I hope the exhibition was (or is) a success.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On ‎5‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 3:11 AM, Richard van Dijk said:

The suff I used is reddish in colour here are some figures to show it is different than brass.

  • "Gilting tombac":
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead 1.5%, tin 3%
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead 3%, tin 1%
    • Copper 82%, zinc 18%, lead, tin 0.2%
  • "French tombac for sword handles", pommels and fittings: copper 80%, zinc 17%, 3% tin
  • "Yellow tombac of Paris" for gilt ornaments: copper 85%, zinc 15%, trace% tin
  • "Hanover tombac": copper 85.3%, zinc 14.7%
  • Chrysochalk: copper 86%, zinc 14%
  • "Red tombac of Paris": copper 90%, zinc 7.9%, 1.5% lead
  • "Red tombac of Vienna": copper 97.8%, zinc 2.2%

we as machinists call this bearing brass as we often use it to replace static or temporary bearings in equipment where the rpm is low or the friction is virtually non existent.

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