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Byron studley

Turkish twist WIP, any tips?

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Hi all just posting some pictures of my first ever Damascus forged on my own at home. I took a class in April with Owen bush where I forged a billet and twisted it ( I haven't  yet done anything with this billet yet). I have now just forged these two 9 layer billets. They are destined to become a Bowie knife for a friend in the Army.

I'm thinking I want two make a Turkish twist pattern with four twisted bars. But in my head I want the pattern to be quite detailed and fine layered. I don't really want a big, bold, low layer pattern

How many layers do you think I'll need before twisting each billet? 

Thanks in advance for taking the time too look and any comments and advice is welcome

 

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If it were me I would go to 36 layers before twisting and twist them at welding heat.

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Ok thanks Gary, that would work ok for me, cut in two stack and weld. Then repeat again. 

How many layers would be too many for a twist? At some point would too many layers make the twist look "muddy" 

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I wouldn't go over 150 layers on something you want to twist tightly, like a turkish twist. A lot of it has to do with the overall texture you're trying to achieve. 

I think a lot about the way in which the lines of the pattern weld can compliment or compete with the lines of your overall piece. For complex patterns like explosion, etc. I like a fairly high layer count such that the viewer becomes focused on the lines of the PW when they closely examine the blade, but they fade together when the piece is viewed a whole, which allows the eye to appreciate the lines of the whole.

Of course, some PW lines are complimentary to the flow of the piece. For example, the weld seam between an edge bar and the rest of the blade. If it parallels the cutting edge, it can really enhance the flow.

Every blade an adventure! 

Enjoy,

Dave

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Dave's last paragraph hits home for me as someone who does not pattern weld but loves to see what others can do. As a personal thing I like seeing an interesting pattern from the spine down but as it gets toward the edge a more traditional series of layers paralleling the cutting edge, from a higher layer count, makes it seem more "purposeful"  like it is A KNIFE with a pattern rather than A PATTERN that was interrupted to put an edge on it.

Sounds silly, I know, but it's what pops into my head when I look.

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Thanks guys I myself also like the effect that at a distance it's a knife with beautiful lines and then as you look closer you see that it's made from a beautiful pattern welded piece of steel.

I'm new to bladesmithing in general and especially new to pattern welding but I'm looking forward to experimenting with this.

I haven't had much time to continue with this untill today, and I've rewelded the two billets to 18 layers each. Going to reweld again up to 54 and I think I'll then twist.

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