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Steve Nowacki

A Bowie in 1080 and Sambar stag with a D,Lisch style split ring guard.

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The blade for this Bowie is made from 1080 high carbon steel, blade length is 256mm, blade width is 42mm and blade thickness on the spine is 6mm. The blade has been differentially hardened with the surface finished with a hand rubbed 600 grit finish. The overall length of the knife is 404mm including the pommel nut. There are three coined nickel silver spacers, two either side of the gun blued bolster which has one central groove. The gun blued D, Lisch style split ring guard has two clam shells and vine file work on either side of the hand guard tine. The Sambar stag handle has been dyed with Fiebings mahogany brown leather dye and sealed with Danish oil. The butt cap is gun blued steel, filed to match the flutes on the stag and has a planished top surface and is held in place with a gun blued pommel nut.
The leather sheath is a Mexican belt loop style with tooled edges, dyed golden brown, the body of the sheath has a front panel of python skin surrounded by a black tooled leather frame.
Thank you for taking the time to look gents, as ever all comments and critique very welcome.

Steve

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Thank you for that Ron, that's very much appreciated buddy.

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Great looking knife and sheath, the attention to detail, and workmanship is amazing. Thanks for sharing Steve.

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Wow!  Great design and execution.  Everything is very crisp and clean.

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Two thumbs up. Awesome workmanship!

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Everything is absolutely top notch.

Doug

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Gents thank you for all of your comments. This one's being picked up at Knives UK on the 24th of this month.

Steve

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Great googly moogly! That's some absolutely superb craftsmanship right there!. Well done, sir. Well. Done.

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Excellent work Steve. Great attention to detail.

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Damn Steve; that is seriously fine work.  Your knives always hit on mark for the knives that I love the most.  I love how dark all of the fittings are, with those small accents of silver.  Understated and fantastic.  

What do you blue with?  Is it cold blue, or a caustic bluing?  Thanks man!

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This knife is excellent!.
I'm interested in what grit you finished the blade at.

 

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Stunning and inspiring come to mind, but words really dont do it justice. Excellent from pommel to tip, sheath included.

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JJ the blade was finished to a hand rubbed 600 grit and I have to be honest it drove me conkers because every time I looked at it there was a scratch that appeared across the grain somewhere and one time after I had finished the blade, oiled it and put it away in it's case I went back and looked at it later and found some more scratches, I really couldn't believe my eyes. That dark theme Wes comes from my love with all of the knives made by CAS, the Sobral brothers, I don't think there is one knife that they have made that doesn't push my buttons. The bluing is Phillips professional cold blue, I do have hot bluing salts in the shop, but I can't get them hot enough and maintain a constant heat to get the best from them, so I stick with the cold bluing solution because I get consistent results from it.

If you are up for it gents I can turn this into a bit of a WIP as I did take a few pictures of the construction of this piece. I know it's a little arse about face as you've already seen the finished item, here are some pic's of the early stages of the hand guard and blade.

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Thanks for the extra info Steve. A question if I may. Assuming the locator pins go into the antler, how did you make sure they were straight?

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"If we are up for it" he says.  Now there's a silly question!  Post away my friend I am sure we are eager to see how this came about. :)

 

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I wondered how you did the nagel.  Either forging it separately and then brazing it on or, as you did, preform it and then forge it from there.

Doug

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What I normally do Charles is drill the bolster first locating the pins in there because it's the thickest piece behind the guard and it's easier to get the holes square in this and hold it in the vice to drill on the pillar drill. Once the slot is drilled and filed and the bolster slips up and down the tang I make the spacers to fit either side of the bolster. When they are finished I put the first one on, put some yellow metal paint marker on the pins, push the bolster up to the spacer and let the paint mark where the holes need to be drilled. I repeat this with the back spacer and drill in my holes. Then I take the three pieces over to the belt grinder and grind the spacers until they match the outside profile of the bolster, the locater pins hold everything in place so they can be taken apart and put back together and will always match. The front spacer is a stand alone item which isn't pinned and the hand guard has to be made and the surface sanded so it's flat before it's slipped onto the tang and the bolsters and spacers slipped up behind it, the pins marked with paint and the holes located on the back of the hand guard. I then put tape on the handle mark lines on this so I can see the basic lines of the tang, drill out the centre and file until it slips on the tang and butts up against the bolster pins, mark where they land on the antler and drill in the holes around 5mm deep.

The next pic's show continuing work on the guard and the hinged portion of the tang.

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Thanks Steve. It’s the drilling of the locator holes in the antler parallel to the tang that had me wondering. Cut down shorter it allows for a small margin of error I suppose when eye-balling it. It looks like the front and rear of the antler handle aren’t parallel and so simply drilling into it using a press using the marks wasn’t going to work. Good WIP BTW. Keep going B).

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Damn, this is a fantastic WIP Steve.  I hope Alan gives it a pin.

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Gents thank you for taking the time to look, I'm really glad that you're enjoying the ride.

These next pic's are of the dry fit up of the handle, the antler after dying with the Fiebings mahogany leather dye and the split ring guard formed and gun blued.

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Pinned it is!  I'm a sucker for a good WIP. B)

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Thank you Alan you're a gent.

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Mahogany!?!?!? not British Tan?    :lol: Sorry Steve, I just couldn't resist.

This is a fantastic WIP. Thanks to Wes and Alan for the pin. How did you cut out the guard for the finger loop?

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Posted (edited)

British tan, come on Joshua you know us Brits don't tan buddy. With eleven months of winter and only two weeks worth of sunshine when I expose my body I'm usually a lovely shade of powder blue and it takes me a week to turn white.

The cut out for the finger ring is initially marked on the template Joshua then I drill the three point of the triangle with a 1.6mm drill. I then cut along the lines with a 1mm thick  x 125mm diameter cutting disc making sure to finish 5 to 10 mm shy of my drilled holes. I finish the cuts with a hacksaw blade that way I can control the last part of the cut and make sure that I don't cut past my drilled holes. As you know using a cutting disc and trying to finish the cut flush especially when you are using just the edge of the disc is very hard. The triangular tongue which eventually becomes the finger ring is small and the margin for error is just as small, I try to take it slow and easy here. Thanks for your comments buddy and yes a big up to Wes and Alan for the pin I'm very honoured.

These last few pic's are of the blade grind, the initial hand rubbed finish and the pieces that go to make up the sheath and one more of the completed knife and sheath together. Guys thank you very much for following the WIP and for all of your very kind and appreciative comments.

Steve

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Edited by Steve Nowacki
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