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I am going to apologize first. I am sure you all are tired of forge build questions and this question has probably been answered before but here goes.

I am building a new propane tank forge yo replace the small paint can forge I have now. I am using 2" insulating blanket coated in itc 100 or something similar. I was going to make a flat floor out of some kind of refractory mortar level with the openings in forge so I would have a nice floor to set my metal on when heating. But I have started leaning toward a firebrick floor to make it easily replaceable in case the floor ever takes damage if I decide to try out forge welding.

So I guess my question is would I be better off using something like satanite for the floor or going with the firebrick idea? If I do firebrick should I go with hard or soft? I know soft will be more easily damaged than the hard will, but the soft should heat up faster and require less fuel to get up to temp. Should I just go with hard bricks and accept I will burn more fuel to get the forge up to temp. knowing I will have to replace the floor far less often than I would with soft firebrick? Is there that much of a difference between soft and hard firebrick as far as how long it takes to warm up? What would you do if you were me lol? 

Sorry for the long post and thanks for any input.

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Hi Ryan, I'm in the same boat...just making my first forge and wondering about the floor. I purchased my material all from Wayne Coe here. He sold me some Kast-o-Lite refractory and some Metrikote IR coating. He's also very knowledgeable and I asked him about the floor he said just to cast it out of the Kast-o-lite. I think the brick, as you say, may give you some more long term durability but it may just come down to preference. Some one with experience will chime in here soon. They're very helpful and n00b friendly here. (I don't know where these guys get the patience) 

Edited by GPrimmer
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That's what I was going to do but then I got to thinking of floor gets eaten up by flux or general use of I went fire brick floor I could just lift bricks out and throw some new in. If I go with castable floor then I would have to mix the cement patch the holes and then let it sit and harden. 

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2 hours ago, RyanMac said:

I am going to apologize first. I am sure you all are tired of forge build questions and this question has probably been answered before but here goes.

I am building a new propane tank forge yo replace the small paint can forge I have now. I am using 2" insulating blanket coated in itc 100 or something similar. I was going to make a flat floor out of some kind of refractory mortar level with the openings in forge so I would have a nice floor to set my metal on when heating. But I have started leaning toward a firebrick floor to make it easily replaceable in case the floor ever takes damage if I decide to try out forge welding.

So I guess my question is would I be better off using something like satanite for the floor or going with the firebrick idea? If I do firebrick should I go with hard or soft? I know soft will be more easily damaged than the hard will, but the soft should heat up faster and require less fuel to get up to temp. Should I just go with hard bricks and accept I will burn more fuel to get the forge up to temp. knowing I will have to replace the floor far less often than I would with soft firebrick? Is there that much of a difference between soft and hard firebrick as far as how long it takes to warm up? What would you do if you were me lol? 

Sorry for the long post and thanks for any input.

I'm in the process of building a different one at the moment.  What you want is Kastolite 30, Mizzou, or Satinite. check out Wayne Coe.

 

http://www.waynecoeartistblacksmith.com/Forge_Supplies.html

Edited by AndyB
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I think we are just beginning to explore the possible applications for Kast-o-lite . Removable flux resistant forge floor protectors for instance. 

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 II used Mizzou in mine and just replaced some of the refractory on the bottom when the flux ate through it after welding a bunch of cable. Mizzou may be flux resistant but it's not flux proof. Granted my bottom layer of Mizzou may not have been thick enough. If your future plans include doing (in my case trying) a lot of pattern welding or welding cable a fire brick bottom wouldn't be a bad idea. I did it for mine since I would rather toss a $5 brick than redo my forge again anytime soon. 

20180611_175511-1305x979.jpg

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The fire brick wont be a quick change. You will end up destroying the Kast-o-lite getting the brick out and having to redo the whole forge. I just use kast-o-lite for the floor.

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Check out the Build A Gas Forge attachment at the Forge Supplies page on my web site.  It shows a much improved way of casting the forge and makes it more versatile too.

Let me know if I can help you.  I prefer e-mails.

 

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It's a quick change for me, takes all of 30 seconds. I used the firebrick as a mold when I put in the refractory, then pulled it out to cure a bit. Periodically went back and put the brick back in during the curing process to maintain the shape and now I have an easily replaceable floor.

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On 6/12/2018 at 8:55 AM, Will Drake said:

It's a quick change for me, takes all of 30 seconds. I used the firebrick as a mold when I put in the refractory, then pulled it out to cure a bit. Periodically went back and put the brick back in during the curing process to maintain the shape and now I have an easily replaceable floor.

That's what I was thinking about doing. Did you use the hard fire bricks or the softer bricks?

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