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justin carnecchia

Integral Damascus Bowie

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Hi, just finished up.. Need to buff handle a bit but close enough. Should be some redemtion for my last thread that got no love ..

300 layers of 1095, 1060, and L6. Amboyona burl and domed brass pins.

Also just for fun, my 11 year old son Jackson's first knife. Blade forged from cable (I welded up cable and did heat treat). (also I guess I ground and sharpened..) but he forged it mostly to shape.

Handle, pine drilled out and shaped entirely by Jack. I helped with the pin too.

Anyway, as always thanks for looking. Feedback welcome and appreciated. -Justin

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I love the flow of the blade and the first impression it makes. The one you made is OK too.

Nice pattern and then the more subtle flow to the edge.

  • Haha 1

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Very very nice!!! You got good contrast between the three steels and the integral bolster looks good also.

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I never knew L6 had that much nickel! Good to know!

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Thanks!

Not positive it was L6.. Guy who gave it to me said it was L6. It was Definately bandsaw blade( think really really big) which I've heard to be 15n20. I don't know that it matters though, they are similar steels especially in damascus patterning.

Thanks again, Justin

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A great pair of blades! The bowie is awesome!

That's several notches above the macaroni art of your typical 11 year old!

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Nice! If you put a little cold gun blue in the thin grooves on the bolster I think it will make the integral guard pop. Great texture on the pattern weld. I'd consider grinding the pin flush rather than having it raised/peened. 

Thanks for sharing.

Dave

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Whoa! Very nice Justin. What is the length of that blade? It looks like one heck of a meat carver. I second Dave's opinion about the domed pin, or at least some careful filing to reduce the height a little and clean up the ridges. I think you are back in the saddle bud!

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That is a fantastic knife Justin; seriously good work man. I do agree on the domed pin too.  Looks like you used 1/8th stock.

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Thanks guys, the pin was not my first choice and was a work around to try to salvage the handle after breaking off a drill bit. Original plans were to be copper and a much smaller diameter. In all fairness though, the pins aren't uncomfortable and till Dave said something I thought they looked pretty good.. Thanks Dave..

I'll say this, I haven't gotten a whole lot of comments from Dave over the years, but it seems like everyone I have gotten had something constructive to say and for that I give thanks. 

I will have to look into the cold bluing solution. I agree, that could look good. 

 

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7 hours ago, justin carnecchia said:

something constructive to say a

That pin is like Cindy Crawford's mole.........

Man what a beautiful knife! B)

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, justin carnecchia said:

In all fairness though, the pins aren't uncomfortable and till Dave said something I thought they looked pretty good..

I actually like the pin as a design choice. I have been using that single mechanical attachment for a while now.

Do you have a Dremel tool or Foredom? You could use that with a cratex wheel to polish off the fiddly-bits and clean that pin up.

Edited by Joshua States

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The problem was that to get out the broken drill bit (the one I got out) I had to carve around it with a very fine burr. Was able to keep the hole small enough that thw handle wasn't trashed, but didn't feel like I had any options as far as how to pin it at that point. I did the domed pin to cover the not quite round hole. At that point I was out of ideas... After 60$ for the wood and a day of time matchbooking, mortising, shaping and polishing I was loathe to the idea of grinding it off and starting over.

I experimented with a pefectly rounded and polished dome, and one that left hints of the hammer marks. At the time I liked this version. For now I'll leave it, as I'd be worried about doing more harm than good trying to change it. 

In the future, I'll make sure to start with sharp bits, so I don't have these problems in the first place. Live and learn, it's the learning bit that's important.

Thanks, Justin

 

 

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Posted (edited)

@justin carnecchia I take it you were drilling though the handle and the tang simultaneously?

Edited by Joshua States

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I typically drill half the hole when mortising handle. Then I can't miss very center of tang. Once I glue up handle, but when still a block, I drill through the other side so everything lines up square. This lets extra epoxy out when gluing on handle, and give a guide hole when I drill the tang after everything is assembled. Has always worked out very well.

This time around I broke a bit when drilling the first hole. Thought I got it out but found more when handle was almost done shaping. Thats the little bit of silver color peeking out from pin.

Then I broke a second bit when drilling through the tang.

It was very frustrating, can't say I've ever had any issues with this method.. But being nervous after breaking the first bit, and not using a new bit didn't help. Till I Thought to dome the pin I figured I was going to have to start handle over.

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With a mortise I would suggest that you put half the handle on. Up tight to the guard/spacer/whatever and clamp the tang to the half-handle. Mark the tang where you want the hole and drill the tang hole separately. Then return to the clamp up and drill each side of the handle separately, using the tang hole as a guide. Then go back and slightly over size the tang hole (optional) to allow for any needed play or misalignment. If you have both sides drilled all the way through, you can also use the pin hole to align the handle slabs when gluing them together to ensure a square fit.

I never drill through handle material and metal at the same time. Especially when the metal is under the handle material. That is just asking for trouble. I once had the metal spiral leave the drill bit and poke its way through a piece of buffalo horn. It was impossible to remove. It literally spiraled its way through the horn.

Just my suggestion

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Posted (edited)

Joshua makes a good point. One of the reasons I use the mortise method for a hidden tang. BTW if you have a few extra bucks shop around for a woodworkers finger router. A neat old tool that, with proper technique, is great for mortising.

Edited by Vern Wimmer

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2 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Joshua makes a good point. One of the reasons I use the monetise method for a hidden tang. BTW if you have a few extra bucks shop around for a woodworkers finger router. A neat old tool that, with proper technique is great for mortising.

Should I assume that "monetise method" is a spelling error, or is this something I have never heard of? Because, if it is a method I am unaware of, please do elaborate!

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Posted (edited)

That is how you get the finitiob work to look professional.

 

 

 

 

I love my alleged "spell checker". It won't let me use the word "tine", as in fork, forklift, but it lets that through instead of "mortise". I'd like to find the geek responsible and tell them to commit ungrammatical acts upon themself.

Edited by Vern Wimmer

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;)

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My thought for future knives was do what I'm doing now, but before gluing, drill slightly oversized hole for tang and fill with epoxy. Then thete shouldn't be any problem drilling through tang, and would still have a little wiggle room if needed (which I always seem to need). That should still give a strong secure fit without any issues drilling.

Hard to say though, maybe just wasn't my day, I broke the first bit just drilling through wood... 

..In the end I was just happy to have a finished knife. 

Should have next one done tomorrow, finished polishing today. Hamon gyuto in w2 and ?? Maybe micarta..and...?

Anyway, thanks for everyones input! It's been much appreciated.

-Justin

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6 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

That is how you get the finitiob work to look professional

Haha. I just thought of old finotiob this morning too when I was reading Geoff ‘s post.

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