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Daniel W

Super Quick Porta bandsaw table.

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A few months ago I picked up an inexpensive porta band-saw. I've seen so many of these pop up in little shops for their versatility particularly when you make them table mounted.  

As I've got an idea for how this thing would help in as an inexpensive table top saw, I over thought the whole idea of how to make the table top. A quick search over the net made me feel stupid as I was again overthinking something simple. 

I used 1/4 10x10in plate steel, and I think you would have to use something stout in this version.  

Using a 7in angle grinder cut the recess for the blade (overshoot it a little) try to make it a little wider than you think for blade drift.

Remove factory cutting table, measure out and line up pilot holes with counter sinks to receive pan head screws.  (I used dividers to plot out where I needed to drill holes.)

Test fit, make sure everything lines up.

Remove plate and weld on a 1/4 x 1/2in angle iron to the edge of the plate. 

remount plate and clamp in vise - ready to cut. 

(I did notice that you can buy these tables to fit these prota band-saws. spend money vs, use the stuff I have laying around.)

20180706_211935.jpg

Yes I missed the first pilot hole, but in keeping it simple, to keep the trigger depressed for working, there's just a little 'c' clamp on it for now that tights down.

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Also should add, these are not recommended to cut any hardened steel.  But this little bugger on the low settings chews though mild steel with ease.

The pan head screws do concern me a little, but while cutting I didn't notice anything negative about them as the only fixing point. Held true If anything happens I may drill and tap for a larger fastener.

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7 minutes ago, Daniel W said:

A few months ago I picked up an inexpensive porta band-saw. I've seen so many of these pop up in little shops for their versatility particularly when you make them table mounted.  

As I've got an idea for how this thing would help in as an inexpensive table top saw, I over thought the whole idea of how to make the table top. A quick search over the net made me feel stupid as I was again overthinking something simple. 

I used 1/4 10x10in plate steel, and I think you would have to use something stout in this version.  

Using a 7in angle grinder cut the recess for the blade (overshoot it a little) try to make it a little wider than you think for blade drift.

Remove factory cutting table, measure out and line up pilot holes with counter sinks to receive pan head screws.  (I used dividers to plot out where I needed to drill holes.)

Test fit, make sure everything lines up.

Remove plate and weld on a 1/4 x 1/2in angle iron to the edge of the plate. 

remount plate and clamp in vise - ready to cut. 

(I did notice that you can buy these tables to fit these prota band-saws. spend money vs, use the stuff I have laying around.)

20180706_211935.jpg

Yes I missed the first pilot hole, but in keeping it simple, to keep the trigger depressed for working, there's just a little 'c' clamp on it for now that tights down.

I actually wouldn't mind having one of those things.  I was actually trying to figure out where I could buy one and for how much I didn't much like the one harbor freight had but I figured it would probably be easier for cutting metal than my chop saw.

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It is nice not throwing sparks everywhere for some simple cuts.  For me, I'm cutting more sheet metal than normal for some of the flowers I do.  The idea is to stack a few plates together to cut multiple plates at once. 

This was one of those buys that with a coupon it was ridiculously cheep.  Trouble is, I really don't have a ton of experience with this brand of tool.  It sounds terrible as it runs, but I have no major complaints about it cutting.  I'm still on the first blade, it is getting chewed up and may need replaced after a few dozen more uses. 

Truth is, if I would have bought this product for its full price, and bought the replacement warranty with it, it would be nearly as expensive as other brands. Dewalt and Ridged are usually the brands I trust for heavy use. I believe the one from Dewalt runs for $300.  If I find that this set up works well for me, and this saw kicks the bucket, then I'll break down and get the better brand with lesson learned.  Or if the discount tool place near mean happens to have one, I might jump on it. 

 

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