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A friend gave me a rusty Nicholson halfround file, I have a few less rusty ones so I decided to test (my forging skill) on this one.

Did heat treat last night, used Gun Gum for clay.....happy with the results.

.......and the best part of the file is still left to play with. B)

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Funny thing is I confirmed to myself yesterday that I was wasting time sanding to 400, 220 followed by the polisher looks just as good and probably people won't mind as much using them.

.......So I wasn't planning anything fancy for this knife! That's changed after a quick dip in FeCl.....

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/16/2018 at 7:15 AM, Wes Detrick said:

I love polishing out hamons.  There is this moment where you can start to see it, and it just gets better as you go.

Ok now you shouldn't have said that..... :lol:

I'm down to 800 grit on the one side, hamon shows up very nicely on the front 1/3 of the blade.....the rest not so much?

How far down the rabbit hole does one need to go?

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I etch hard after 80 grit to see what I've got, then work my way to 2,000, do another lighter etch, Polish from 1,200 back to 2,000, do one more etch and take it from 1,200- 3,000.

You can do the same thing and stop at lower grits though.

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You will hit a point of deminishing returns. Some effects such as the whispy effects in the habuchi, and utsuri can be lost if you go too far. But you won't loose too much. If it looks really good, stop searching for better. 

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Thanks Zed

Only problem is that finish is probably not appropriate for the blade, but I can't stop now :D

I gave the other side (200 grit and quick etch) a touch on the polisher and that looks nice as well! 

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On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 3:24 AM, Gerhard said:

Normal vertical quench into Canola oil.  Used Gun Gum as a clay substitute ;)

 

I had to go look up what Gun Gum was, we use to use something similar on my sons racecar at the headers because it was the only thing the could withstand that intense heat produced by the headers!  

Nice hamon. that is gonna be a great knife when you finish it out!! B)

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I got both sides even on 400, going to try for 800 and then etch briefly and polish.

If I go 1500 (finest I have) and polish whoever buys it will leave it sitting in the sheath and that nice finish will just rust.... :P

5 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

Personally, I see nothing wrong with that finish.

Doug

That was 220, minute's polishing and a quick etch.

I really wasted a lot of time sanding everything to 400, really not necessary most of the time.

1 hour ago, C Craft said:

 

I had to go look up what Gun Gum was, we use to use something similar on my sons racecar at the headers because it was the only thing the could withstand that intense heat produced by the headers!  

Nice hamon. that is gonna be a great knife when you finish it out!! B)

Thanks, let's hope so!

The Gun Gum trick was advice on a South African knife making FB page, I don't know of anything else I could use except maybe real clay....which I wouldn't know where to get!  Gun Gum is available everywhere and it's dirt cheap. 

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800 grit, quick etch in new batch of FeCl and polish.

Beating myself up about the handle, need to do something special but keep it light and fast....

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2 minutes ago, jheinen said:

Hmmm...methinks I need to try this hamon thing. That's a beautiful blade.

Don't do it! (lest ye be swept away into the dark hamon chasing abyss never to come out again!)

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On 7/30/2018 at 4:53 PM, GPrimmer said:

could you please comment on your ricasso. I'm curious as to your design here and would be interested in your thoughts. 

It's almost non-existent, and there was no design.

I literally took the most rusted half-round file I had to see if I could get something useful out of the several that I have.......flat files are easy.

Forged what I could, ground out what I could and ended up with this.  The blade is thin, I'm planning a brass guard and I want to keep the knife light and fast in the hand.

Still a bit stumped by the handle, made a piece of brown Linen micarta with it in mind but that didn't tickle my fancy....so still on the drawing board so to speak.

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6 hours ago, Gerhard said:

It's almost non-existent, and there was no design.

I literally took the most rusted half-round file I had to see if I could get something useful out of the several that I have.......flat files are easy.

Forged what I could, ground out what I could and ended up with this.  The blade is thin, I'm planning a brass guard and I want to keep the knife light and fast in the hand.

Still a bit stumped by the handle, made a piece of brown Linen micarta with it in mind but that didn't tickle my fancy....so still on the drawing board so to speak.

But the ricasso... it looks like you drilled a hole and then slotted it. I've never seen anything like that, and wondered if it served a purpose... I mean, why even have a ricasso I suppose?

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Ah, that is not a ricasso.  That is a subtype of choil (the little divot at the edge which demarcates the sharp bit from the dull bit) called a Spanish Notch, presumably because it was popular on Spanish knives in the early 19th century.  It serves no purpose beyond aesthetics, although you can make one that doubles as a bottle opener.  

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29 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

demarcates the sharp bit from the dull bit

Because it does this, I think of it as an aid for sharpening, too.  You can sharpen right up to a notch, without an awkward transition.  I'm mainly thinking about the average user sharpening throughout the life of the knife, and less so the maker with the initial sharpening.  

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@GPrimmer I think I understand what you're asking, it's a bit unclear due to the angle of the photo.....

:) I was trying to be fancy, I believe that's what you would call a keyhole sharpening notch......and relatively sure I got the idea here :lol:

The blade is thin and the grind high, plunge is smooth and not really visible on the photo.

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