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Eastern Fusion "Ancient" Dagger


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Hello everyone, I am very excited to show you my latest knife! This one is an Eastern fusion dagger. I took a very Western blade style, the double edged dagger, and used a variety of Eastern techniques and materials to give a unique spin on a traditional blade. Hope you enjoy! :)

First, a little bit of info on the blade:

The blade is hand forged out of W-2 and was differentially quenched with clay, leaving a subtle, icy hamon down its length. The habaki and guard are made from nickel-copper mokume gane, hand forged by me, ~36 layers. The habaki has a bias ground pattern and the guard has a very tight raindrop pattern. Both the guard and habaki were patinated in liver of sulfur and then brushed with high grit sandpaper for a rustic black, orange, and silver finish. Behind the guard, there is a wrought iron spacer that has been blackened. The handle is spalted jatoba burl stabilized by K&G. Its color ranges from tan to a deep orange brown with vibrant black spalting, it matches the mokume and wrought iron very well. The tang itself is a through-tang, and is peened over a mokume gane spacer and an inlayed piece of wrought iron. I also made a nice vertical stand for the blade. The base is made from curly spalted maple and features a live edge on the back. On the top is a decorative copper piece with a naturally aged patina, and a small piece of inlayed black leather for the tip of the dagger to rest firmly and safely in. The pole holding the dagger is hand forged wrought iron, I forged it square, twisted it, and hot cut it to form a small nook for the handle of the blade to sit in, before seating it securely in the base.

Now for the stats:

OAL: ~13.25"
Blade Length: Just Over 8"
Blade Width: Just Under 1" at its Widest Point
Blade Thickness: ~.25" w/ a Distal Taper in Both Directions
Blade Steel: Differentially Quenched W-2
Handle Materials: Nickel-Copper Mokume Gane, Wrought Iron, Stabilized Spalted Jatoba Burl
Stand Dimensions: 5"x8.5"x10.5" (WidthxDepthxHeight)
Stand Materials: Curly Spalted Maple, Black Leather, Copper, Wrought Iron

Now for some pictures (I apologize for the poor quality, photography is not my strong suit :oops:):

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I'm not a super well known maker, but I like doing these challenging, creative builds to help increase my skill and hopefully get my name out there. In the interest of improving, let me know what you think! I can take criticism pretty well, so don't hold back. If you have any questions about the build feel free to ask down below as well :)

Thanks for looking,
-Grant

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I really like this blade. The direction in which you took it is fantastic too, a habaki on a dagger of this style is a unique touch, and you executed it very nicely. The pattern of the mokume, the hamon, and the handle play against each other very well. Its a busy knife, in a good way. 

The stand is a nice touch too. 

Did you make a sheath? Just curious. 

Edited by Will W.
Grammar
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Thanks for your input, I appreciate it.

I didn't end up making a sheath, once I finished the blade I was trying to decide whether or not to do a stand or a sheath, and I ended up going with the stand because I thought it would be unlikely for someone to carry a long dagger like this around their belt. Although it is 100% functional, it just seems more like a display knife than something you'd carry around, and stands like this are pretty often used for double edged daggers. It also helps that if, in the future, I decide it needs a sheath I can still make one for it!

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The mokume, patina, and spalted wood goes together very well; i like it a lot. if i had anything to suggest, it would be the very end of the handle seems perhaps a bit wide for my taste, but there really isn't anything wrong with it. love the dagger grind.

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Thanks for the input Steve. The handle was a bit hard because it's not a very typical handle and I didn't have anything to really model it after, so I just drafted it up on paper as best I could and went from there. But I can definitely see what you mean.

And the wood is definitely one of the coolest pieces i've ever used! Visually, it looks like it would be really rough, but the stabilization allows it to be polished up like a stone. I chose a piece without too much spalting because I didn't want it to be too busy, but I've seen some pieces of jatoba before with some of the craziest spalting you'll ever see!

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