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Zeb Camper

Broken back seax... Tear it apart fellas!

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I think the only gripe i have with this blade of yours is that the tang in every peice iv seen in collection books (stuff like oakshot ect) or google foo of museum blades was they had a really big tang. That said i dont fault you for it given how precious this blades material was.

Fingers crossed on removing that warp :)

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Thanks! 

I've seen some with big tangs, and some with nubs. Probably just depended on your smith. 

Imagine the Earl commissioned you to make a 20" bladed seax and you worked that steel for weeks. You then realize it's shaping up to be 18"... Time to nub that tang :ph34r:

I tried to get the warp out, but this thing is just not having it. I'm gonna take it to the shop oven and make a long needed tool to fix this. 

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Guest

can you get a close up of the knot? Im guessing theres a knot in the spine. ooh yeah im seeing 3 individual bends it looks like in the picture. Need to add another clamp on the top right between the quarter and the wire on the blade section.
 

Im guessing you did a partial quench and not a full blade quench leaving a portion of the lower blade untouched? theres a line and a color difference.

Edited by Guest

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I had it under pressure there to correct the warp. The "wires" (coat hanger) is holding the spine of the blade down so that it stays straight while the edge is bent. That's why there are "shims" (quarters) on the edge on either side of the clamp and one on the spine side. 

It seems complicated, but it was trying to do what I wanted. It just didn't have enough over correction room to get it out.  

I'll switch to plan b now. 

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Probably 2 wrenches and a vice. I was gonna make a jig, but I just realized I'm too broke to buy the parts :lol:. Call this "plan B.5"...In other news; this may be up for sale soon!...Maybe plasma or a kidney as well...  

 

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Guest

Could always do what i do. I place a towl on the anvil a towl on the steel and then grab my sledge like alec steele and thump the shit out of the bend.

Edited by Guest

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This is really turning out bad a$$!!! The twisted PW spine is awesome. Your on your way to earning a fiery beard. Hopefully I will be following ya!

Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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Hey guys! Another question if I may... Did this style ever have a convex grind?

Cuz this one already does :wacko:

Here's a progress shot. I couldn't get the lighting right. It's got a cool little auto hamon. I left the pattern more reserved. Needs more polish. 

20181215_170615.jpg 

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Luckily, most of them are slightly convex.  B)

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Here's what I'll be shooting for on the handle. It's close to the carvings on a ship in the Oslo museum. I'm gonna try oak but I know it'll be tough. 

Let me know what you think.

20181216_222615.jpg

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Nice drawing!

You may want to find something a little more Anglo-Saxon in style, though.  These long brokenbacks are pretty much an Anglo-Saxon cultural marker.  That said, it's really hard to tell the difference between some Norse and Anglo-Saxon art styles since they're so darned similar...

Look at the Sutton Hoo and Staffordshire Hoard materials for motifs and inspiration.

Finally, use white oak if you can get it, it's less chippy than red oak.  And it takes a fake bog-oak look better as well if you want to blacken it.

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Ok, so more knots and less of the "gripping beasts"? 

I think I can do that. Probably be easier too! 

Thanks!

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Still lots of beasts, just more abstract.  Not that it matters, Jeroen will tell you no carved seax handle has ever been found anyway... ;)

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My favorite YouTube video series is rowan Taylor recreating the sutton hoo chain. The belt buckle is pretty wild also. 

Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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They may not have been found but it seems like they carved most anything they could. ships, chests, walls, stones... I think it's very likely they carved at least one at one point or another... 

But then again, what would be the point? It's covered mostly by the sheath, and not visible when held. It would increase the grip, but perhaps limit minuveraility... 

I don't think a spear, axe, or sword would have carving, so it may be out of place to do any carving. 

I might skip it on this one.

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Not sure I can resist the carving. This style was inspired by the Staffordshire hoard. Mostly inspired by the helmet piece and partly by the knife fitting. 

What do you think? 

20181218_223337.jpg

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I'd say carve it if it your gut tells you to.  Otherwise you'll always wish you did.

FWIW, I wish I could even sketch something like that, let alone carve it :)

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4 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

I'd say carve it if it your gut tells you to.  Otherwise you'll always wish you did.

FWIW, I wish I could even sketch something like that, let alone carve it :)

This.

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Your carving layout looks good, but it's worth going over your design and making sure it follows the alternating over/under knotwork pattern as much as possible. This isn't an exact science  with beast knots where the pattern can split and has multiple terminals, but it goes a long way to making the carving look cohesive and finished...

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Thanks guys! 

Thanks Jake, I'll redraw it so that it alternates better. I added some parts after outlining the sketch in Sharpie, so that's partly why its so irregular. I'll work on terminating the ends better too. Perhaps a border of some sort. 

So a carving it shall have! 

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And here we have the ol' seax all wrapped up; epoxy curing. Looks like I'll get to unwrap this tomorrow morning as an early Christmas gift! 

The handle looks small in this pic, but it's 23 cm (somewhere around 9.5") long. The blade is 21 1/2 inches.

I tried a piece of oak that was really old firewood but it cracked :(. I remembered me and a buddy had cut some white ash about 4 years ago to make handles and he let me have a piece. It drilled well and I burned the tang in to fit it just right after brooching. It all went very well.

The balance is a few inches up the blade. It feels very aggressive. 

20181223_163528.jpg

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