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SteveShimanek

Started my power hammer project

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Started this project recently....it took a while to cut this excavator jackhammer bit to size, then cut some C channel from an excavator frame and welded it together, and set it on an old weigh scale for a base. Everything is still loose as i am designing on the fly and don't want to do anything permanent i might regret later :) Planning for a guided helve style actuated by air and an old hydraulic cylinder. I think the anvil is about 350 pounds; 6.5 inches by 38 inches with some relief from where the bit attached to the hammer. If anyone has part numbers for valves etc from McMaster Carr i would be grateful.

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Edited by SteveShimanek

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Thanks Josep, that is a great resource.

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Building my power hammer was a fun project. I am goimg to build an air hammer some day. The hydraulic cylinder might need some different seals in order to run fast enough. Hydraulic runs slow and high pressure and air runs fast with fairly lower pressure so the seals are different. There is a guy that built a self contained air hammer and I believe he used hydraulic cylinders converted to air. So it can be done. Good luck and have fun.

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I have heard that about the differences in hydraulic vs pneumatic cylinders, but....when i just shot air in from a blowgun into the fitting, the rod moved quickly enough for me to believe it will work as needed for forging, as the pressures required are much lower than typical tasks hydraulic cylinders perform....if anything, the seals on hydraulic cylinders should be over-engineered for the task, as long as they stay lubricated. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, and a free cylinder is pretty attractive.

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I made some more headway after going down the mountain for fresh gas bottles today. I got everything in the photo fabbed and welded up; it is all nice and solid and reasonably plumb and square.

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Made another trip to the scrap yard to look for parts; brought home some heavy wall 4 inch square tube for  a tup guide and some truck spring bundles. Shop time has been hard to get lately but will post more when i make some headway. (Later) Made some progress; working out the geometry of the moving parts, got the guide and ram up. Next is to make an axle and attach the springs.

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Looks really solid!!!

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I'll be watching ........:ph34r:

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I like it! It will make a world of difference when you get her going. It looks tough.

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Holes drilled and tapped for the guide and bearing mounts; ram filled with lead....really quieted it down. I may have to fill the top and bottom braces with something as well to cut down on noise from there as well. I have about a bazillion holes that need to be filled on the main column to be able to fill it with a sand/oil mix to deaden the ringing noise there.

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After mulling a bunch of ideas, i ended up using a couple of 2x8s with a 2x spacer to block off the holes in the column, and filled the remaining space with a sand/gravel mix. Took out the ringing added, weight, and i can still drill through the column for fixtures if needed. Made parts for connecting the cylinder to the frame and the spring. Pictures to follow.

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Lathes are handy when you need to make your own bushings. Treadle is the next item to make, then prep and paint before buying and installing the air controls. I have just under a month into the project so far, and am probably under $100 so far, as most of this was recycled stuff from the scrap yard and repurposed and refabricated. Ram weight is 46 pounds and travel is just under 11 inches. Everything feels and sounds very solid.

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31 minutes ago, SteveShimanek said:

Quote

Lathes are handy when you need to make your own bushings.

Sadly I have one & never find the time to figure out how to run it. :(

That will be my goal, turn it on make something with no injuries or pieces flying. 

Next my mill... oh I need to help!

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Lots of good u tube vids on lathe running; i am still learning myself, but it is not too complicated for simple things like bushings. I still regret selling my milling drill press some moves back; having one would complete my shop setup.

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I'd have a hard time living without a lathe...

That's looking like a beast Steve.  I really need to consider building a hammer someday, and am watching eagerly :) 

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Hello
in my opinion and experience is a cylinder too big
The air consumption will be very much and the filling time very long

hola 
en mi opinion y experiencia  es un cilindro demasiado grande 
el consumo de aire sera mucho y el tiempo de llenado muy largo

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Maybe, maybe not....sometimes you have to use what you have and then deal with the results. The beauty of designing and building your own machine is that it can be re-engineered if necessary. Gracias por su opinion.

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Regarding the usefullness of a lathe; i  bored out the inner diameter of some washers to fit over the 1 inch pin at the bottom of the cylinder, eliminating a drive down the mountain to look for hardware. Very handy!

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The other thing about the way i have set this machine up is that i am not using the full stroke of the cylinder (using maybe 1/2) so the whole cylinder is not being filled and exhausted; this also should enable harder hits as there is lots of stroke left when the die bottoms out.

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how will your treadle controls work? from my limited understanding, a clutch type mechanism is needed for engaging the actual hammer blows. will it be a part of your air circuit?

watching this, have been kicking around ideas for a power hammer for a little while, and your doing what i was thinking, only i was thinking electric motor with clutch 

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Hi Ross; air operated hammers have a different mechanism  than motor operated systems. The same basic form of helve style could be actuated using a motor and tire style clutch; however, mine will use a hydraulic cylinder in lieu of an air cylinder, which is then actuated with roller valves and an air gate with the treadle serving to start and vary the strokes.

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