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Well, I finally got this to the point where I decided to make this thing. I would like to go through the building process, but first I have to give thanks to those who have done this before. So, if you are thinking of putting together a solid fuel forge, take heed. These threads were incredibly useful for me and they will aid you too. The folks who posted them and those who chimed in with advice, suggestions and technical data provided enough variants that you can make what you want. need or have the scrap parts laying around.

Whether you have a premade firepot like Justin Mercier did, or you want to fabricate your own like Charles du Preeze did, or you want to go the ancient tried and true method of "a box of dirt" like Gerald Boggs, these threads will get you there. Thanks again to all those who participated in them and provided their knowledge and support.

 
 
 
 
I traded a HF anvil for this rusty old wheel rim forge a few years back. It was packed with some sort of white clay that eroded away over the last few years. The fire pot looked solid and the blower needed a little work, but the set-up wasn't what I wanted. I wanted more of a table type where extra coal could be readily available and I wanted it mobile.
Wheel rim forge V2.jpg
 
So, I started dismantling it. The bolts that held it together were rusted so bad, it took a little MAPP gas torch and a half can of WD-40 to get most of them to come apart, Some were so bad and unreachable so the fire-wrench (oxy-acetylene torch) was put to use. The pieces parts.
Pieces parts V2.jpg
 
Now to raid the wife's steel yard for frame materials...….
 
 
Edited by Joshua States
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2 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

Now to raid the wife's steel yard for frame materials...….

I have a great wife, but alas, that is a phrase I doubt I'll ever get to use.

Thanks in advance for posting your build.  I'll be following along.

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For the table I have a piece of 1/4" sheet. Well, two pieces actually. The piece I could get was 49" long and 19" wide, so I cut it in half and can make the table about 25' x 39". Then, I cut some 2x2 x1/8" angle iron and built a frame.

Fabrication (1).JPG

Cut out a hole in one of the two pieces for the firepot. As you can see, I put the lower sides of the firepot so they flushed out with the surface of the 1/4" plate. There's a little gap there.

Fabrication (2).JPG

And, used some 1x1x1/8" angles for the fire pot support and to close the gaps between the table bottom and the firepot.

Fabrication (3).JPG

Now some 2x2 square tube for the legs and some 3/16" by 4 " flat plate for the leg gussets. I also added a couple of hand truck wheels and some 5/8" threaded rod for the axle.

Fabrication (4).JPG

Some cross ties to take the twisting motion away, a couple of tool racks and two railroad spike for handles.

Fabrication (5).JPG

Here it is after wire wheeling most of the rust off.

Fabrication (6).JPG

Now it's off to work on the blower.

 

 

 

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I'm actually considering making a coal forge again.  I still have a break drum that I haven't used lol it's just been rusting.  I could easily clean it up, Id have to get some 2 inch pipe and a fan.  But I could easily do that.  Don't think Id go as intricate as a metal table but I've already got a fire pot lol.

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Looking good Josh. A had to cut the angle-iron frame down in front of the pot as I couldn’t lay longer objects flat. I may still have to do the same to the other side but I’ve not had to work on anything that long and, for the moment, it stops the coal falling off the table :D.

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Hi Joshua, nice job so far, looks great! As mentioned by Charles that angle directly in line with the fire pot will get in the way. You only need to remove a small section so you can lay longer stock flat on the table. The "sweet spot" in that fire pot is on a level plane even with the top edge of the pot with about two inches of fuel mounded above the work. The depth of the pile below the work will use up most of the available oxygen giving you a more neutral flame at the top edge of the pot. This especially matters when you're welding and even during normal forging it's nice to have less scale to deal with. Even the small amount of tilt caused by the lip will have your work going in at a less than optimum angle if the stock extends past the edge of the forge table. You can also make a simple flip over gate that can be opened and closed. Close it with shorter work to help keep stray coal on the table and open it as needed. I look forward to seeing further progress!

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Thanks for the suggestions Michael & Charles.

I am considering adding a coal stop on either side of the front of the fire pot to create a coal bin on the larger side of the table and removing the current sides of the frame so a work piece can lay flat across the fire pot. The only trouble with that plan is the vertical portion of the frame angle is where all the vertical strength is, and that section is where all of the weight is. So removing that vertical piece will weaken the structural integrity of the frame. I may have to add another support below the current frame to remove that piece.

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You already have nice gussets in the corners, just flip some angle with one leg down and tack it on under what's already there before you cut the up turned leg off your angle frame. the extra face hanging below the table will give you attachment points for a tong rackB)

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8 hours ago, MichaelP said:

You already have nice gussets in the corners, just flip some angle with one leg down and tack it on under what's already there before you cut the up turned leg off your angle frame. the extra face hanging below the table will give you attachment points for a tong rackB)

Yep. That's what I was thinking about right after I made that last post. An angle iron on the bottom of the side rail 4" either side of the notch should  suffice. (Make it so, number 2.)

Now where did I leave off? Oh yeah the blower.

Here it is before rehab.

Blower.JPG

Yes, that's an original rheostat speed controller. I was able to get the fan off the motor and dismantled, I also got the R-stat opened up and cleaned, but I could only get minimal access to the internal parts of the motor. A little rust removal, lubrication and new wires and this baby runs great. 

Now I took that cutout piece of plate and a few bits and pieces for supports. Now it's bolted to its own table that is welded to the frame.

A little 3" duct from Home Cheapo and she's ready for business.

Almost done (2).JPG

Almost done (1).JPG

The rheostat goes from "Off" to "Full" in a very smooth sweep. So it is capable of very small adjustments.

Blower (2).JPG

I plan on building a side-draft hood on the short end of the table behind the fire pot. Then I'll be able to bring it indoors and hook it up to a suitable exhaust duct if necessary.

That's where it stands today. If anyone has any suggestions, fire away. I am all ears.

Almost done (3).JPG

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Looking good, I love that old rheostat!

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