Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JamesK

Damascus from files?

Recommended Posts

Just a question about using files for patterns...I have 3 old files that I forged all into same width billets, as well as a nail spike I did the same with, and cleaned them all up into 4 separate small billets. Is it possible (or plausible) to create very simple Damascus from these components? I don’t have a welding kit or even power tools, so I was thinking weld each piece separate then combine them, and I could fold that billet over 3 or 4 times for a very simple pattern

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for reference these are my 4 billets (first 3 are files last is the nail spike), they’re a lot darker in the photo I had to use my flash

D8C7DE08-BEB4-4067-8C44-71F71CD38780.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since they are all the same type of steel you won't get a lot of contrast in the pattern, but yes, it's certainly possible and plausible.  If you don't mind a little carbon loss you could even add some thin mild steel strips between the file bars.  Mild usually etches bright these days.  As long as you keep the volume of mild versus file low, you won't lose too much carbon.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Since they are all the same type of steel you won't get a lot of contrast in the pattern, but yes, it's certainly possible and plausible.  If you don't mind a little carbon loss you could even add some thin mild steel strips between the file bars.  Mild usually etches bright these days.  As long as you keep the volume of mild versus file low, you won't lose too much carbon.  

Ok awesome, thanks! I have this old giant billet of steel from Lowe’s that is so low in carbon so I could probably use that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/25/2018 at 10:56 AM, JamesK said:

I have this old giant billet of steel from Lowe’s that is so low in carbon so I could probably use that

That probably isn't the cleanest low carbon steel in terms of chemistry (may have a bit of Cu or other tramp elements).  It therefore may not weld exceptionally easily.  Or it may work great.  You can never tell what it is going to be like when buying A36 like that.  Buying known 1020 (or similar) is safer for getting easier welds.  But safer isn't always the name of the game when it comes to things like this.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...